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In-Box Review
135
US M19A1 40mm Gun Carriage
US M19A1 Twin 40mm Gun Motor Carriage (Korean War)
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by: Darren Baker [ CMOT ]


Originally published on:
Armorama

Introduction

The following introduction is as provided by Bronco Models:
The M19 gun motor carrage was based on the M24 Chaffee light tank built by Cadillac and Massey-Harris. It was a light anti-aircraft tank, mounting 2 40mm Bofors guns in an open topped turret. The 40mm Bofers anti-aircraft gun was adopted by the US Army after six British built guns were trialled in 1941. It was by far the best anti-aircraft gun in its class, with a muzzle velocity of 881 meters per second, and an effective range of 7,000 meters. The M19 mounted two weapons side by side, with 352 rounds of ammunition. It entered service in late 1944, and saw action in the ground role as an infantry support weapon, where it was very effective. As the war ended the production was cut to 285 vehicles from the original order of 904 units. The M19 saw action again in the Korean War 1950-53 in the ground role supporting Infantry. A small number were exported the Netherland Army in 1951, and a few to the Japanese Ground South defence force in 1954. The M24 fleet was replaced by the M41 Walker Bulldog in the early 1950s. The M19 was also withdrawn, but the turrets were removed and mounted on the M41 hull to produce the M42 Duster of which 3700 were eventually built. The M19 had a road speed of 56kmh and a range of 241 kilometres. In action the M19 was normally manned by a crew of 6 soldiers.

Review

This offering from Bronco Models is packaged in the usual cardboard box with card lid, the box was very heavily crush damaged at one end despite having been packed inside a further cardboard box. Fortunately the contents were not damaged due to there being space inside the box. The contents inside are all packaged in either sealed plastic bags or Ziploc plastic bags, with the contents being individual or dual sprues in each bag. There is a small quantity of photo etch, some of which is unfortunately very small. Plus a nice, small decal sheet has been provided by Bronco Models.

The lower hull is a single piece moulding, requiring a front and rear plate. There are a number of small elements that need to be added, that will require care during placement. The suspension system is a torsion bar affair and as with the Chaffee’s the suspension is fully workable, providing care is taken during construction. The shock absorbers present on some of the suspension arms, have been provided in two parts in order to maintain a fully workable and accurate suspension. The road wheels and return rollers have been accurately rendered and are attached via a pin, in order that they can rotate after being added. The drive wheel is made up of four pieces and again can continue to rotate after being added, via a pin that is added at the back of the bell housing. The idler wheel has been slide moulded and with the addition of photo etch produces a very accurate rendition of this aspect of the vehicle.

The tracks have been provided as individual workable track links, with Bronco models having provided both the T85E1 and T72 tracks, which are again workable. The track guards have been very finely moulded to what I believe is a scale thickness and so care will be required during removal from the sprue, and addition to the model.

The main weaponry in the form of the Bofors guns and the secondary weaponry in the form of a 50 calibre machine, have slide moulded barrels to provide the hollow effect of the muzzles and have been moulded as a single piece to avoid mould seams on the barrels.

The upper hull has been moulded as a single piece and will require a large quantity of additions to finish it. The tools have all been provided separately, and so look good. The crew access hatches have been provided with clear periscopes and photo etch protective frames. However, they will not easily be displayed open. The back end of the Bofors guns have been very well detailed, but will again require a great deal of care due to a large number of very small parts having to go together in some assemblies.

The interior of the open turret has been very well tackled from the seats to the mounting plates, and even the communications equipment in the form of radios have been well represented. The large number of ammunition bins being have been included and presented well. An aspect of the model that has not been considered, is that there is a pin that you are advised to push through the upper hull and then secure the upper hull to the model. This pin is to secure the turret to the vehicle, and allow it to rotate. However, I cannot see anything that would prevent the pin from falling inside the hull and from that point on would not be accessible.

An auxiliary generator has been provided in the model kit, but it has been pointed out that this is a post Korean War edition. Bronco models has provided four finishing options for this release, in the form of:
M19A1, 15th Anti Aircraft Artillery Battalion, 7th Infantry Division, US Army, Hung Nam Korea 1951.
M19A1, 46th Anti aircraft Artillary Battalion US Army, Hanau, Germany 1954.
M19A1 15th Anti Aircraft Battalion, 7th Infantry Division, US Army Hung Nam Korea 1952
M19A1 Dragon Slayer Merdc Winter veriant camouflage

Conclusion

This is a very good model of the M19A1, but it is not an easy to make model. The slide moulding that has been used has provided some great detail that reduces the amount of clean up required and made life easier for the modeller. The number of very small detailed parts of the model do make this a difficult kit, but a difficult kit that will look very good when completed.
SUMMARY
Darren Baker takes a look at the US M19A1 Twin 40mm Gun Motor Carriage (Korean War) model in 1/35th scale released by Bronco Models.
  Scale: 1:35
  Mfg. ID: CB35148
  Related Link: 
  PUBLISHED: Nov 12, 2018
  NATIONALITY: United States
NETWORK-WIDE AVERAGE RATINGS
  THIS REVIEWER: 87.04%
  MAKER/PUBLISHER: 87.97%

Our Thanks to Bronco Models!
This item was provided by them for the purpose of having it reviewed on this KitMaker Network site. If you would like your kit, book, or product reviewed, please contact us.

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About Darren Baker (CMOT)
FROM: ENGLAND - SOUTH WEST, UNITED KINGDOM

I have been building model kits since the early 70’s starting with Airfix kits of mostly aircraft, then progressing to the point I am at now building predominantly armour kits from all countries and time periods. Living in the middle of Salisbury plain since the 70’s, I have had lots of opportunitie...

Copyright ©2019 text by Darren Baker [ CMOT ]. All rights reserved.



Comments

I don't know why people keep copying the inaccurate Wikipedia article on the M19. No, the turrets were not re-used on the M42. They are completely different turrets. And while the M19 was produced before WWII ended, I have yet to see any documentation that any made it to Europe before the war ended, let alone were actually used in combat.
NOV 12, 2018 - 08:04 AM
Yep, did not make it into combat during WWII. It did see heavy action in the Korean War though, as a ground support weapon for the most part, where it was very effective. And agreed, the turret was never used in the successor M42, as has also been erroneously reported. The manual was not printed for it until July 1945, after the war was over (I owned one--it was marked "Restricted"). I think all this was mentioned in a thread on the M19 when Bronco announced the kit several months back. The kit comes with a MERDC camouflage profile (along with several 1950's era vehicles) which is also fictitious--it's based on a repaint in a museum someplace, but the M-19 was long out of service with the US Army by the time MERDC arrived. It Looks like a great kit though. VR, Russ
NOV 12, 2018 - 01:38 PM
I have clearly pointed out that the introduction is the one provided by Bronco Models. I did find it a little odd that the US would remove the turrets of tanks just entering service at the end of the war in order to add this anti-aircraft turret to the hulls. I also wondered why the MERDC colour scheme was included when the introduction itself states that the vehicle was out of service at this time. As regards the transplanting of the turrets from one tank hull to a newer tank hull I can see happening at the beginning before a custom designed effort is ready.
NOV 12, 2018 - 11:59 PM
Yep, did not make it into combat during WWII. It did see heavy action in the Korean War though, as a ground support weapon for the most part, where it was very effective. And agreed, the turret was never used in the successor M42, as has also been erroneously reported. The manual was not printed for it until July 1945, after the war was over (I owned one--it was marked "Restricted"). I think all this was mentioned in a thread on the M19 when Bronco announced the kit several months back. The kit comes with a MERDC camouflage profile (along with several 1950's era vehicles) which is also fictitious--it's based on a repaint in a museum someplace, but the M-19 was long out of service with the US Army by the time MERDC arrived. It Looks like a great kit though. VR, Russ [/quote] I do hope that you both are certain about the turrets. I edited the articles on Wikipedia about the M19 and M42 ..... / Robin
NOV 13, 2018 - 01:38 AM
Robin, As far as I know, the M42 was a completely new design (Based on the M41 chassis) with a completely new gun tub based on the turret ring size and depth available on the "new" M-41 chassis (There were also changes made in gear drive and electronics). The M42 bearing races were different sizes from the M-19 as I recall. They both used the same gun tub general layout and design features, and do look similar, but the gun tub was not "interchangeable". The engine for the older M-26 chassis was moved into the center of the vehicle, and the gun tub sat behind the engine, with the driver's compartment in front--making it a "mid engine" AFV. The M42 was a more conventional AFV design, with the gun tub ahead and the engine in the rear, this meant the gun tub had to sit higher by a few inches. The M19 gun tub sat lower in the hull than the M-42. I'm not an expert, but the M42 and M19 are two of my favorite US AFVs. I think someone here on Armorama has actually made measurements to compare the two, which explain better than I can on why the two are not inter-changeable, but I forgot who that was. Need to look at the old postings when the Bronco kit was first announced. At one time I was going to kit-bash a Bronco Chaffee with an AFV Duster to get an M-19 (which is why I had an M-19 manual). But the more I researched the M-42, I I realized I'd need to really modify the AFV gun tub to fit the Bronco chassis properly. VR, Russ
NOV 13, 2018 - 11:00 AM
   

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