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 Community Forum: Kiwi Korner
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GIB solutions for walls
caister
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Napier, New Zealand
Member Since: July 02, 2007
entire network: 14 Posts
KitMaker Network: 0 Posts
Posted: Sunday, July 01, 2007 - 06:38 PM UTC
Greetings to all

After purchasing a small diorama building dor an inordinate amount of money I knew there had to be a simpler solution. Using an old piece of GIB board I set about carving, shaping, painting and weathering. The resulting buildings were not only what I wanted, but cost next to nothing.

Windows, doors and brickwork were simply carved or cut out. The board takes paint really well and gives an authentic look of stone or brick.

I'm sure there are others out there who have already discovered this but thought it may help

Mac
CReading
#001
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California, United States
Member Since: February 09, 2002
entire network: 1,706 Posts
KitMaker Network: 555 Posts
Posted: Monday, July 02, 2007 - 12:53 AM UTC
I assume GIB board is the same thing as wall board/drywall/gypsum board? If so, it does work well. How did you go about removing the paper ?

Cheers,
Charles
caister
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Napier, New Zealand
Member Since: July 02, 2007
entire network: 14 Posts
KitMaker Network: 0 Posts
Posted: Monday, July 02, 2007 - 07:19 PM UTC
Greetings Charles

We are talking about the same thing ! I usually pencil in the areas to be cut out and carved. Then they are 'scribed' with a craft knife. Now the fun begins: firstly I peel as much paper off as I can, followed by sanding with varying degrees of sandpaper. The doors and windows are then cut out completely and any shrapnel damage is gouged out. In many cases I leave the paper on and only peel off tiny sections which are then detailed with brick work. The remaining paper when painted and dusted with pastel gives a really good imitation of plaster.

This board has also been used for bases - carving cobbles is painstaking but really rewarding. By stacking 3 or 4 pieces of varying width on top of one another (like a step pyramid) and then attacking the stack with a craft knife in a random manner some very realistic large rubble piles can be created, requiring a minimum of purchased bricks having to be added.

Regards
Mac