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Photography
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help with blue background
SIRNEIL
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England - South East, United Kingdom
Member Since: July 30, 2007
entire network: 658 Posts
KitMaker Network: 40 Posts
Posted: Monday, December 31, 2007 - 05:30 AM UTC
hi guys
can anyone please tell me why most of the good looking pictures on the kitmaker network have a blue background.
i am very new to photographing my models and any help is greatly appreciated.also my wife bought me a canon 350D for christmas and any help as to how to get the best from my new toy will also make me a very happy modeler.
happy new year & all the best.
neil
Grumpyoldman
Staff MemberConsigliere
KITMAKER NETWORK
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Florida, United States
Member Since: October 17, 2003
entire network: 15,323 Posts
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Posted: Monday, December 31, 2007 - 06:52 AM UTC
OK, I really don't know why others do it, but I do know why I do it.
I use several different blues though, (they range from a rich royal blue to a pale blue grey) as it supplies a nice contrast between the OD or green/browns (my usual subject colors) and helps me keep a better white balance color. Plus being half color blind, and brain dead, it allows me to adjust the photo easier, simply by posting a small section of the background paper or cloth to my monitor while editing. If I get the back ground to match the sample, chances are the rest will work out.
wbill76
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Texas, United States
Member Since: May 02, 2006
entire network: 5,425 Posts
KitMaker Network: 341 Posts
Posted: Monday, December 31, 2007 - 07:09 AM UTC
Neil,

Dave's got it pretty much dead-on. The purpose of a light blue background is to provide a contrast for the camera "eye" to compare the subject against and achieve a good color contrast/balance. Different light sources create different color wavelengths of "white" depending on whether they are flourescent, incandescent, outdoor, etc. The camera will use the backdrop as a means to correct for this depending on the settings. Depending on your camera, it may prefer different shades of blue to achieve the right setting so experimenting and getting to know your camera is key.

Using a blue background also has the added effect of allowing it to be post-edited in many software applications to remove the background and replace it with something else such as a country scene, urban setting, etc.
SIRNEIL
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England - South East, United Kingdom
Member Since: July 30, 2007
entire network: 658 Posts
KitMaker Network: 40 Posts
Posted: Tuesday, January 01, 2008 - 08:11 AM UTC
CHEERS DAVE
SIRNEIL
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England - South East, United Kingdom
Member Since: July 30, 2007
entire network: 658 Posts
KitMaker Network: 40 Posts
Posted: Tuesday, January 01, 2008 - 08:12 AM UTC
THANKS A LOT BILL
Bigskip
#035
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England - South East, United Kingdom
Member Since: June 27, 2006
entire network: 2,482 Posts
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Posted: Wednesday, January 09, 2008 - 12:16 PM UTC
And there was me just thinking it looked better!!

Andy
desertfox42
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Texas, United States
Member Since: September 05, 2005
entire network: 173 Posts
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Posted: Thursday, January 17, 2008 - 06:30 PM UTC
If you are looking for an inexpensive source for blue backgrounds you can try the local fabric shop. Here in Texas I go to Walmart but I am not sure that you have those there. Anyway, when you go to any fabric shop there will be bolts of fabric remnants. These are usually sold here for about one US dollar per meter or yard.
I have found that poster board works well also but it sends to get stained rather quickly. Regarding fabric, I prefer to use canvas as it is fairly wrinkle free and does not reflect light. I would have thought that felt would work the best but, as it turns out, it will reflect light and will not give the flat appearance best for background use.
Also, try to use a card table or something that you can leave set up for photos all the time. The more you tear down you photo area the more wrinkles and stains you will pick up. Plus, when you get your lighting set up you really need to leave it alone. More than once I have been jockeying my lighting around and have had it fall over and smash my hard work!! (true story) Best of Luck!! Robert
SIRNEIL
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England - South East, United Kingdom
Member Since: July 30, 2007
entire network: 658 Posts
KitMaker Network: 40 Posts
Posted: Friday, January 18, 2008 - 03:34 AM UTC
thanks for the advice robert
i have purchsed some blue fabric and will soon be trying to photograph my challenger 2 with my new camera witch should be interesting as i haven't got a bloody clue how to use it.now where's that instruction book
neil.
HawkeyeV
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Wisconsin, United States
Member Since: September 20, 2006
entire network: 319 Posts
KitMaker Network: 184 Posts
Posted: Sunday, January 27, 2008 - 03:48 AM UTC
The blue background I use is background photography paper that can be purchased from
http://bdcompany.com/front.htm


I recently published an article in my newsletter about "How I Photograph..." email me and I will forward you a copy.

gerald@hawkeyeshobbies.com