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Campaigns that are either in planning or underway should be grouped here.
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BogiBg
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Västra Götaland, Sweden
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Posted: Saturday, May 18, 2019 - 07:39 AM UTC

Quoted Text

As they say Bogi, "the best laid plans of Mice and Men often go awry", Still looking great though.

Sounds like you too are being Blitzed by Blitzs.

I have the Dragon Opel Maultier and the Tamiya Blitz. Maybe for a future campaign...



Maybe for this one, later on...
I was blitzed because your picky eye didn't catch my mistake on time.
And now you will be punished by having to comment on one more of my entrys for this campaign. 8th, I think...
BogiBg
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Posted: Saturday, May 18, 2019 - 07:52 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Angel, Bogi, I think you should make Opel brand advertisers. Good luck. I look forward to the sequel.
Kalin



Kalin, I am hard-core fan of 80' and 90' Opels.
SpeedyJ
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Posted: Saturday, May 18, 2019 - 07:44 PM UTC
Now that sounds like a good idea. Opel Campaign.

Kind regards,

Robert Jan
ayovtshev
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Sofiya, Bulgaria
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Posted: Saturday, May 18, 2019 - 09:23 PM UTC
You said a mouthful here,Robert!

I will gladly join one,

ayovtshev
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Sofiya, Bulgaria
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Posted: Saturday, May 18, 2019 - 09:58 PM UTC
Bogi,

Bear in mind- Kalin is master in casually bringing up ideas, that sound great and require (all others to do) a massive amount of work to fullfill them...

In Bulgarian we have a special word for such kind of people-muzovir.
The word comes from the region, where Kalin was born.And such behaviour is very common with people from this region.

I'm a frequent victim of this muzovir
Just an example- I sent him yesterday evening a picture of the wooden load bed walls I did for my Blitz A:


All he said was- What? Use that bottom?!?
So today I'll do the load bed bottom from wood...

No rest with this guy!

Therefor, here is one for you, Kalin!


SpeedyJ
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Posted: Saturday, May 18, 2019 - 10:05 PM UTC
Kalinated, watch out
Lovely work over here, like the wood very much.
Time my brother gets back to the CNC machine. He just changed sone positions for the machines in his workshop. He can produce a very fine veneer from almost ever wood available over here.

Kind regards,

Robert Jan
ayovtshev
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Sofiya, Bulgaria
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Posted: Sunday, May 19, 2019 - 12:39 AM UTC
Thanks Robert!

I love working with wood-took 3 years of carpentry education when I was teenager and spent many summers in a carpenter workshop while studying in University.
I adore the scent of freshly grinded wood (my teacher used to say-this scent makes you dream forrests while you sleep).

On the other hand- it is your Bolddivision 5 t. Einheitsanhaenger that reminded me wooden cargo bed is best represented by wood.

I suspect the load bed of the truck I model was produced not in Adam Opel's factory, but in Bulgaria.
Further-I suspect, that-most probably- all Bulgarian A types were purchased via the Bulgarian distributor of Adam Opel AG.

Not ordering directly, but going through local middleman was a well known and frequently used way to circumvent German unwilingness to supply its then ally with vehicles, that were in high demand by the Wehrmacht.

Bulgarian Opel distributor since 1939 was ENA- a company, situated in Russe and owned by the brothers Gabrovski.
Besides importing vehicles and vehicle frames, they produced all sorts of wooden load beds(the company also held a license for production of Opel Blitz W39 Kraftomnibuss bodies, and produced close to 80 KOM's on imported frames).

Bulgarian made load beds were reasonably cheaper than German ones.

So it was a win-win deal for both the Army and the distributor:
-the Army received vehicles, that would have been otherwise impossible to receive via official channels(and that happened many times with various vehicle types),while
-the distributor ordered only the frames and had the added value of producing the load beds for these frames.

There is a story in everything and something to learn everywhere.
That's why I love this hobby,


165thspc
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Kentucky, United States
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Posted: Sunday, May 19, 2019 - 01:20 AM UTC
Angel - I love your insights into non-German suppliers durning the war. I have some similar stories regarding US vehicle sub-contractors in the auto industry during the war.

As to wood truck bodies I wish to offer a slightly different viewpoint - not as a criticism or contradiction but just a somewhat different take on the question and as an alternate solution:
_______________________

I worried that at least sometimes the grain of the soft woods we tend to use in our modeling is so large as to be out of scale with the rest of the model.

In the past I started out always using "wood for wood" but now I go a different way. I build up my truck bodies using individual strips of "distressed" plastic strip using the same "board by board" construction method as the real thing.

By "distressed" I mean I drag a hobby saw across the length of the uncut strips a number of times to create the irregular grain lines and then give them a light sanding to #1 knock off any burrs, #2 roughen up the entire surface of the "wood" and finally #3 knock off the sharp corner edges so the plank divisions of the separate boards will show more once assembled.

Once again I am not in disagreement with anything said here. I am just offering an alternative. However I think I did just made myself into a muzovir!






Here a "scratch/conversion" of a Steyr freight truck with a wood load body:
SpeedyJ
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Posted: Sunday, May 19, 2019 - 02:26 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Thanks Robert!

I love working with wood-took 3 years of carpentry education when I was teenager and spent many summers in a carpenter workshop while studying in University.
I adore the scent of freshly grinded wood (my teacher used to say-this scent makes you dream forrests while you sleep).

On the other hand- it is your Bolddivision 5 t. Einheitsanhaenger that reminded me wooden cargo bed is best represented by wood.

I suspect the load bed of the truck I model was produced not in Adam Opel's factory, but in Bulgaria.
Further-I suspect, that-most probably- all Bulgarian A types were purchased via the Bulgarian distributor of Adam Opel AG.

Not ordering directly, but going through local middleman was a well known and frequently used way to circumvent German unwilingness to supply its then ally with vehicles, that were in high demand by the Wehrmacht.

Bulgarian Opel distributor since 1939 was ENA- a company, situated in Russe and owned by the brothers Gabrovski.
Besides importing vehicles and vehicle frames, they produced all sorts of wooden load beds(the company also held a license for production of Opel Blitz W39 Kraftomnibuss bodies, and produced close to 80 KOM's on imported frames).

Bulgarian made load beds were reasonably cheaper than German ones.

So it was a win-win deal for both the Army and the distributor:
-the Army received vehicles, that would have been otherwise impossible to receive via official channels(and that happened many times with various vehicle types),while
-the distributor ordered only the frames and had the added value of producing the load beds for these frames.

There is a story in everything and something to learn everywhere.
That's why I love this hobby,





Thats interesting, my father started his working carreer in modifying Opel Blitz at a local company in my home town.
Buying Blitz trucks and vans from the late '40 and early '50 , restore and modify for commercial use. Trucks were strong and cheap, maintenance was a piece of cake he always said. That was the same with the more expensive American trucks. For the heavy industry that became a success, but s local business could not afford that and relied on old German scrapyard rebuilds. He told me this story on a Saturday afternoon when we walked on the premises of that company, I did not know that particular story, been there so many times, by that time, the Garage still existed, owned by others, but it was a very special moment.

Kind regards,

Robert Jan
165thspc
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Posted: Sunday, May 19, 2019 - 02:30 AM UTC
Excellent story Robert. Thanks for sharing!
165thspc
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Posted: Sunday, May 19, 2019 - 02:30 AM UTC
Opel Blitz (2x4 & 4x4) walk around on the Armorama site at:

http://armorama.com/modules.php?op=modload&name=SquawkBox&file=index&req=viewtopic&topic_id=218643&page=1
165thspc
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Posted: Sunday, May 19, 2019 - 02:45 AM UTC
With four hobby manufactures now offering a variety of plastic Biltz kits** from freight, to bus, to coal gas, why, Why, WHY is no one offering a 4x4 Blitz in plastic ?

Having the 2x4 truck model already takes care of a major portion of the tooling. However the cabs on the two trucks are decidedly different and that, no doubt, would be a major portion of the tooling $$$.


** Italeri, Tamiya, Dragon and Roden
BogiBg
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Västra Götaland, Sweden
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Posted: Sunday, May 19, 2019 - 03:17 AM UTC
"Having the 2x4 truck model already takes care of a major portion of the tooling. However the cabs on the two trucks are decidedly different and that, no doubt, would be a major portion of the tooling $$$."

Michael, what is the difference between cabins?
165thspc
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Posted: Sunday, May 19, 2019 - 04:17 AM UTC
I had hoped you would ask. - My only motive here is the shareing of information.

As to the 4x4 cab:
- The entire cab/hood/fender assembly sets higher on the frame.
- Fenders are set roughly 5-6 inches lower relative to hood.
NOTE: bottom edge of bonnet cover is perfectly straight and does not arch up over curve of fender as on 2x4 cab.
- Fenders are also set 4-5 inches farther to rear as vehicle front axle is more rearward to help differential clear the underside of engine oil pan.
- Fenders are so far back that the rear edge cuts into front lower corner of cab door.
- Front bumper sheet metal is part of body sheet metal rather than separate piece of more traditional spring steel bumper.

2x4 cab:
- Sets lower on frame.
- Fenders higher relative to hood and further forward.
NOTE:bottom edge of bonnet (hood) arches up over curve of fender.
- Fenders are far enough forward as to not interfere with cab doors.
- 2x4 cab has traditional pressed steel bumper mounted as separate piece to front frame extensions.


Examples:

Typical Opel Blitz 4x4's:










Typical Opel Blitz 2x4's







All Photos Copyright Michael Koenig 2009 - All rights reserved.
BogiBg
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Posted: Sunday, May 19, 2019 - 04:38 AM UTC
Ok Mike. We again had misunderstanding. When you say "cabs" I am thinking that you are talking about drivers compartment, not fenders and bumpers. English is not my native language, so maybe I understand wrong. So, cabins are the same. Except for dial faces and configuration. Thanks
165thspc
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Posted: Sunday, May 19, 2019 - 04:57 AM UTC
The entire cab/hood/fender assembly differs between the two vehicles but I admit the cab (driver's compartment) probably differs the least. The biggest difference in the driver's compartment is that it sits so much higher on the 4x4. Everything sits higher even the engine on the 4x4. When the hood goes up and moves to the rear everything else has to move with it. That is why it is better to look at it all as one assembly not separate parts.

I did notice in the photos that you had a 4x4 cab assembly sitting on a 2x4 frame and that started me wondering if you realized the difference?

There are also other slight early, mid and late production differences in the cabs but these have nothing to do 4x4 versus 2x4.

Some cabs were built with more driver headroom. (The roof curves up higher.) One cab had front opening "suicide" doors. And some cabs were built with a pressed cardboard or wooden rear wall to save on metal. These cabs tend to have a flatter rear wall and appear to have more clearance space between the cab and the loadbox.

Cab interior: (Not exactly the greatest shot!)

Note: Rifle rack on dash and floor and defroster mounted on windshield.
BogiBg
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Posted: Sunday, May 19, 2019 - 05:15 AM UTC
One more thing Mike...
I don't know is this is your model or not

but engine seats totally wrong. Cab is lifted and engine should go up too. And I think that air filter is from 4x2 type.

Angel, Robert, nice stories. And I am in for Opel campaign.

Angel, nice work but I have to agree with Mike. Wood grain is maybe too rough. We will see after you put some paint on it. One more thing I like is idea of making plastic look like wood. Lately, I found new method and it's wife friendly (read - dust free)

This is done without effort since I will over-paint it with gray and wood grain effect is done to be seen after chipping.
Cheers
BogiBg
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Posted: Sunday, May 19, 2019 - 05:23 AM UTC

Quoted Text


I did notice in the photos that you had a 4x4 cab assembly sitting on a 2x4 frame and that started me wondering if you realized the difference?


I don't now what are you thinking of? Everything on the model outside of engine compartment is Dragon.
petbat
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Queensland, Australia
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Posted: Sunday, May 19, 2019 - 08:11 PM UTC
Great Info Guys. Mike, I had never noticed the differences until you pointed them out.

I'd be up for an Blitz Build too, but not until later this year.
165thspc
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Posted: Monday, May 20, 2019 - 02:31 AM UTC
BogiBg: I have several 4x4 Blitz chassis and vehicle constructions going at one time and the chassis you see in that photo with the open hood and the radio van body is now an Ambulance with closed hood. I don't usually do anything to alter the stock 2x4 engine if the vehicle is to be posed with a closed bonnet.

ayovtshev
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Sofiya, Bulgaria
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Posted: Monday, May 20, 2019 - 03:23 AM UTC

Quoted Text

... However I think I did just made myself into a muzovir!...



Muzovir is someone-soft spoken, laconic and bit joking- who is always spot on into "pushing" you to perfect what you do.

In other words- a musovir is a positive figure.
The more muzovirs (around me) in the hobby, the better.

165thspc
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Posted: Monday, May 20, 2019 - 03:30 AM UTC
Sorry BogiBg, my mistake. It was Angel who posted the 4x4 Blitz cab and since I had only seen 2x4 chassis I was thinking it was a 4x4 cab sitting on a 2x4 chassis.

BogiBg
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Posted: Monday, May 20, 2019 - 04:10 AM UTC
No problem Mike. I will start my work on 4x4 Blitz as soon as I collect everything needed so your input will be welcome when the time comes.
ayovtshev
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Posted: Monday, May 20, 2019 - 04:42 AM UTC
Bogi,

Which kit & sets you intend to use in your Blitz 4x4 build?

I assume the 4x4 will be the PlusModels conversion, but- as I've only built Italeri Blitzes sofar, and PlusModel's set states it is made for Italeri kit- do you intend to use it with some other producer's Blitz?

Just curious,

165thspc
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Posted: Monday, May 20, 2019 - 04:58 AM UTC
Alternate proposal/suggestion:

I used the driveline parts from the Chevy CMP 15 cwt. model. (GM owned Opel both before and after war so stands to reason parts would be similar.) The Opel employed an oval differential whereas the CMP used a round one. Also the CMP had a slightly wider wheel track than the Blitz. Both these differences can be solved with a single vertical saw cut down thru the center of the CMP differentials to narrow both the differential and the wheel track.

Photo shows CMP driveline installed on Blitz frame: