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Airfix MGB Roadster
Merlin
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Posted: Wednesday, December 12, 2018 - 08:46 AM UTC
Hi again Mark

What I've quoted as working time is probably conservative - depending on the prevailing temperature where you are. I might be able to eke it out to 5 mins here in the UK at this time of year. Whatever - it's always longer than standard commercial modelling filler.

I should also say that it sticks like the proverbial **** to a blanket(!) and feathers-in really well.

All the best

Rowan
Joel_W
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Posted: Wednesday, December 12, 2018 - 09:20 AM UTC
Warren,
Just saw your 1963 B. Simply gorgeous.
Joel
warreni
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Posted: Wednesday, December 12, 2018 - 11:16 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

OK, so maybe the talc thing isn't a thing. It's good to know that there's about a hour of working time before the CA turns to stone. So how do you apply the accelerator? I tried using the sprayer but that 'fogged' the rest of the plastic, now I just try to get a few drops off of the bottom of the spray tube or off of a toothpick onto the puddle of CA.



Mark,
I also tried the pump when I 1st used it. The stuff went everywhere. Not only does it leave a residue, but you waste more of it then you use.

You get the best results by not actually letting the accelerator touch the CCA glue. I use a micro brush that's just damp from the accelerator, not soaking wet. I then wave it over and as close to the CCA glue as I can get it without touching it. Works like a charm.

Joel



Thanks Joel. More pictures available upon request.

I actually just dip the pump bit in the accelerator and use the plastic tube to apply the accelerator. Pump clogged up long ago.
Merlin
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Posted: Saturday, December 15, 2018 - 09:00 AM UTC
Hi Warren

Could you post a photo of the inside of the doors, because the detail on the Airfix kit is so shallow, it's pretty useless. Whether I can do any better is another matter, but it would be great to know what it should look like.

Also - the dashboard, so that I can try to source some semi-suitable dials from my stash of aircraft (Hiss! Boo! LOL!) decals.

All the best

Rowan
Joel_W
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Posted: Saturday, December 15, 2018 - 09:43 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Hi Warren

Could you post a photo of the inside of the doors, because the detail on the Airfix kit is so shallow, it's pretty useless. Whether I can do any better is another matter, but it would be great to know what it should look like.

Also - the dashboard, so that I can try to source some semi-suitable dials from my stash of aircraft (Hiss! Boo! LOL!) decals.

All the best

Rowan




Rowan,
All my gauges were by Smith. The Tach was only off by about 1,000 rpm, so off to service and recalibration it went.

As for the dash, I installed a Walnut veneer face plate to give it a little panache.


Joel
warreni
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Posted: Saturday, December 15, 2018 - 04:31 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Hi Warren

Could you post a photo of the inside of the doors, because the detail on the Airfix kit is so shallow, it's pretty useless. Whether I can do any better is another matter, but it would be great to know what it should look like.

Also - the dashboard, so that I can try to source some semi-suitable dials from my stash of aircraft (Hiss! Boo! LOL!) decals.

All the best

Rowan



Didn't type any of that bottom line of the plast post! Anyway, as requested:





















Any questions just ask. Can take better photos of guages but there are lots on the www.

Cheers
Warren
Merlin
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Posted: Sunday, December 16, 2018 - 03:05 AM UTC
Hi Warren

That's fantastic - thank you! Just the ticket.

All the best

Rowan
Merlin
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Posted: Sunday, December 16, 2018 - 03:18 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

Hi Warren

Could you post a photo of the inside of the doors, because the detail on the Airfix kit is so shallow, it's pretty useless. Whether I can do any better is another matter, but it would be great to know what it should look like.

Also - the dashboard, so that I can try to source some semi-suitable dials from my stash of aircraft (Hiss! Boo! LOL!) decals.

All the best

Rowan




Rowan,
All my gauges were by Smith. The Tach was only off by about 1,000 rpm, so off to service and recalibration it went.

As for the dash, I installed a Walnut veneer face plate to give it a little panache.


Joel



Hi Joel

My old Morris didn't have a rev counter, so I've never got used to one (I still just listen to the engine).

Driving my friend's modern car a week or so ago, I started to suspect the speedometer was faulty... until I realised I was looking at the rev-counter! (It was placed exactly where the speedo was on the Morris) Luckily, I found we were actually travelling at pretty much exactly the speed I'd estimated when I did finally look at the correct instrument!

I must admit a walnut dashboard is tempting. I think we had one even in my Dad's Triumph Herald back in the mid- '60s,

All the best

Rowan
warreni
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Posted: Sunday, December 16, 2018 - 07:21 AM UTC
The wooden dashes didn;t come in until the Mark II came along I think. I am sure Google can help.
Removed by original poster on 12/16/18 - 21:32:15 (GMT).
Joel_W
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Posted: Sunday, December 16, 2018 - 09:31 AM UTC

Quoted Text



Hi Joel

My old Morris didn't have a rev counter, so I've never got used to one (I still just listen to the engine).

Driving my friend's modern car a week or so ago, I started to suspect the speedometer was faulty... until I realised I was looking at the rev-counter! (It was placed exactly where the speedo was on the Morris) Luckily, I found we were actually travelling at pretty much exactly the speed I'd estimated when I did finally look at the correct instrument!

I must admit a walnut dashboard is tempting. I think we had one even in my Dad's Triumph Herald back in the mid- '60s,

All the best

Rowan



Rowan,
Now that's what I call old school for sure. Back in my college days, I had my Dad's 96 Saab, which had a 3 cylinder/2 cycle engine and no tach. Getting a date while driving it was a major accomplishment

Joel
Joel_W
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Posted: Sunday, December 16, 2018 - 09:34 AM UTC

Quoted Text

The wooden dashes didn;t come in until the Mark II came along I think. I am sure Google can help.



Warren,
I installed the Walnut veneer dash myself. Took all of 5 min including removing it from the plastic package.

Joel
warreni
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Posted: Sunday, December 16, 2018 - 10:43 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

The wooden dashes didn;t come in until the Mark II came along I think. I am sure Google can help.



Warren,
I installed the Walnut veneer dash myself. Took all of 5 min including removing it from the plastic package.

Joel



What about all the guages and switches you had to transfer?
Joel_W
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Posted: Sunday, December 16, 2018 - 12:13 PM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text


Quoted Text

The wooden dashes didn;t come in until the Mark II came along I think. I am sure Google can help.



Warren,
I installed the Walnut veneer dash myself. Took all of 5 min including removing it from the plastic package.

Joel



Warren,
honestly, from what I can remember, the veneer fit right over them perfectly.
Joel

What about all the guages and switches you had to transfer?

Merlin
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Posted: Monday, December 17, 2018 - 07:40 AM UTC
Hi again Warren

Another quick question - this time concerning the seats. Airfix have moulded them with open backs:



I wouldn't worry, except that the back of each seat will be clearly visible when the kit's finished. Are the real seats open-backed or covered? If the backs are open, can you see the frame etc. inside?

All the best

Rowan
DaveCox
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Posted: Monday, December 17, 2018 - 07:50 AM UTC
The seats on our B-GTs were closed back with built in headrests - they were both 1970s chrome bumper Mk11s.
Merlin
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Posted: Monday, December 17, 2018 - 08:16 AM UTC
Cheers Dave

That pretty much confirms what I thought - i.e. the open back in the kit was just easier for Airfix to mould.

As I say, I wouldn't worry if it was out of sight, but I did a double check and the backs of the seats will be there for all the world to see.

All the best

Rowan
DaveCox
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Posted: Monday, December 17, 2018 - 08:24 AM UTC
Just remembered something else - If I were you I'd paint the kit seats as leather. I never saw a car with cloth seats more than a year or so old where the seats weren't sagging in the middle! Ours both had heavy-duty packing foam wedged between the seat cushion and the floor !!! The dash on both cars was a crackle-finish satin black finish
Joel_W
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Posted: Monday, December 17, 2018 - 08:29 AM UTC
Rowan,
My seats had full backs. I don't remember about the sag from seating on them, but I'm sure that there had to be some.
Joel
Merlin
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Posted: Monday, December 17, 2018 - 08:40 AM UTC
Hi again

Yep - definitely leather for this build - plus some fancy pin-striping according to the specs. I'll probably try using Fantasy Printshop decal stripes for that.

The seats in my old Morris Traveller were really comfortable (although they undoubtedly wouldn't pass modern seating ergonomics tests! ) - but they had one real downer... they were vinyl-covered. Fine in winter, but on a hot summer's day...

All the best

Rowan
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Posted: Monday, December 17, 2018 - 08:49 AM UTC

Quoted Text

they were vinyl-covered. Fine in winter, but on a hot summer's day...


My parents gave me their 1965 Buick Special Deluxe in 1973. V6, 3 speed automatic transmission, AM radio, black vinyl seats and no air conditioning. When I moved to Florida with the car, I left a LOT of me on those seats, wearing shorts on hot summer days.
warreni
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Posted: Monday, December 17, 2018 - 09:14 AM UTC
Covered. The seats in my car are vinyl covered and have been since 1963. But there is no sag apparent at all. I will take some more photos if you want?
Joel_W
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Posted: Monday, December 17, 2018 - 09:55 AM UTC
Warren,
I could have sworn that my seats were leather. I googled it just now and from 62-68 they were indeed leather.

Rowan,
As for the piping, my seats were black with black piping.
Joel
warreni
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Posted: Monday, December 17, 2018 - 10:12 AM UTC
Joel, I am not sure as I really haven't given them the sniff test.. But they definitely haven't sagged and they don't really burn your thighs when you get in after a bit of sun exposure so they could be leather. Will see tonight. How else can you tell leather from vinyl?
Not that it really affects a 1/32 model..
Joel_W
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Posted: Monday, December 17, 2018 - 10:39 AM UTC
Warren,
Vinyl eventually would dry out and crack, & in the summertime they got really hot. Leather taken care of lasted a life time.

Like I said, I honestly don't remember if my seat sagged or not, but they never cracked, nor did they stick to your legs while wearing shorts in the summer time.


Joel