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Modeling in General
General discussions about modeling topics.
What is the best filler to use?
Trackedon
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Queensland, Australia
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Posted: Wednesday, November 28, 2018 - 12:52 PM UTC
Hi all, I have used tamiya,green putty,and super glue. I am asking you people on here for some other ideas, and types of putty out there ?
retiredyank
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Posted: Wednesday, November 28, 2018 - 02:06 PM UTC
For ejector pin marks, I use Tamiya or Squadron white putty. For small gaps, Vallejo is my go-to. For sink marks, I use Bondo. The biggest drawback to Bondo is its color and dry time. For hose joins, it's Mr. Dissolved Putty. I've never had any luck sanding Dissolved Putty. I also make my own, with MEK and sprue shavings. I'm still trying to achieve the perfect consistency. Overall, I prefer Tamiya reduced with lacquer thinner. I have also never had any joy, with super glue.
SSGToms
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Posted: Wednesday, November 28, 2018 - 02:14 PM UTC
Honestly, for most applications I use automotive Bondo Red Spot putty in the tube. It's inexpensive, adheres to everything, doesn't shrink, and sands to a glass smooth finish.
For tiny gaps I use Mr. Surfacer 500. You can paint it into the crack with very little cleanup.
Then there's True-Earth Waterfiller Putty. You paint it into the seam, let it dry, and clean away the excess with alcohol. No sanding.
Klaus-Adler
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MODELGEEK
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Posted: Wednesday, November 28, 2018 - 02:40 PM UTC
I use perfect putty.

It's water based so the excess can be wiped away with a wet cotton bud, this also reduces the amount of sanding later on.
Kevlar06
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Washington, United States
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Posted: Wednesday, November 28, 2018 - 05:02 PM UTC
I use two types exclusively-- the first is Tamiya Grey or White. The second is Bondo. Both are super smooth and dry quickly, and are easy to sand. Done correctly, they are easily applied. The Bondo is cheaper, but the red color is more difficult to cover than the Tamiya.
VR, Russ
varanusk
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ARMORAMA
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Posted: Wednesday, November 28, 2018 - 08:20 PM UTC

Quoted Text

For ejector pin marks, I use Tamiya or Squadron white putty. For small gaps, Vallejo is my go-to. For sink marks, I use Bondo. The biggest drawback to Bondo is its color and dry time. For hose joins, it's Mr. Dissolved Putty. I've never had any luck sanding Dissolved Putty. I also make my own, with MEK and sprue shavings. I'm still trying to achieve the perfect consistency. Overall, I prefer Tamiya reduced with lacquer thinner. I have also never had any joy, with super glue.



Agree (except for Bondo, which is not available here). Tamiya can be thinned with acetone, BTW.
Reforger-Victim
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Hessen, Germany
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Posted: Wednesday, November 28, 2018 - 08:43 PM UTC
for gaps and holes I use warm wax..there s nothing better..but needs alot skills and is not cheap (electronic waxing device)..but you doesn t need to snd anymore and especially on small gaps (figures etc.) you can t get any better result...
RobinNilsson
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Posted: Wednesday, November 28, 2018 - 08:54 PM UTC
I do not use putty on plastic models.
Never.
Ever.

I use strips and pieces of styrene to fill gaps and holes.
I invested in a punch-and-die set and it can also be used to punch out small discs of styrene that fit perfectly into ejector pin marks.
Vac-formed food packaging contains areas where the thickness changes so almost any required thickness can be found.
Sprues and the little flags on the sprues are another readily available source of styrene fillers.

Dissolving styrene to make "putty": I stick little strips and pieces into the gaps and holes and then add a small amount of solvent. This turns the surfaces of the original kit parts and the added bits into soft putty which then cures again.
This variant of homemade "putty" cures a lot quicker since most of it is already cured/hardened.

/ Robin
Namabiiru
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Posted: Thursday, November 29, 2018 - 12:55 AM UTC
All like Mr Surfacer 500 and 1200, also Tamiya White Putty, but they are prone to shrinkage. I'll need to give the Bondo a try.

matt
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Posted: Thursday, November 29, 2018 - 12:59 AM UTC
Automotive body putty here as well for the larger gaps. To thin it down, I mix in a touch of Tamiya extra thin cement.
retiredyank
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Posted: Thursday, November 29, 2018 - 02:14 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Automotive body putty here as well for the larger gaps. To thin it down, I mix in a touch of Tamiya extra thin cement.



I thought Bondo is water-based.?
StanNC
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Posted: Thursday, November 29, 2018 - 03:01 AM UTC

Quoted Text

For ejector pin marks, I use Tamiya or Squadron white putty. For small gaps, Vallejo is my go-to. For sink marks, I use Bondo. The biggest drawback to Bondo is its color and dry time. For hose joins, it's Mr. Dissolved Putty. I've never had any luck sanding Dissolved Putty. I also make my own, with MEK and sprue shavings. I'm still trying to achieve the perfect consistency. Overall, I prefer Tamiya reduced with lacquer thinner. I have also never had any joy, with super glue.



My experience having tried well mixed Mr. Dissolved Putty was that after allowing for good long dry time, it broke down when wet sanded. Is there some trick to using this product? Dry sanding just clogs the sandpaper. I have not found English instructions on the internet. Anyone else have this experience using this product? Any advice on it's use?
I have also tried Perfect Plastic Putty. It is water based and can be easily cleaned with a wet swab but I have had little success after it dries in wet sanding this product. Any others with similar experience? Container has no information as to being able to wet sand this product. Water clean-up is nice but I have still found it necessary to perform a final sanding and sometimes a second pass after priming with this product.
retiredyank
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Posted: Thursday, November 29, 2018 - 03:40 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

For ejector pin marks, I use Tamiya or Squadron white putty. For small gaps, Vallejo is my go-to. For sink marks, I use Bondo. The biggest drawback to Bondo is its color and dry time. For hose joins, it's Mr. Dissolved Putty. I've never had any luck sanding Dissolved Putty. I also make my own, with MEK and sprue shavings. I'm still trying to achieve the perfect consistency. Overall, I prefer Tamiya reduced with lacquer thinner. I have also never had any joy, with super glue.



My experience having tried well mixed Mr. Dissolved Putty was that after allowing for good long dry time, it broke down when wet sanded. Is there some trick to using this product? Dry sanding just clogs the sandpaper. I have not found English instructions on the internet. Anyone else have this experience using this product? Any advice on it's use?
I have also tried Perfect Plastic Putty. It is water based and can be easily cleaned with a wet swab but I have had little success after it dries in wet sanding this product. Any others with similar experience? Container has no information as to being able to wet sand this product. Water clean-up is nice but I have still found it necessary to perform a final sanding and sometimes a second pass after priming with this product.



Once cured, I dry sand PPP with no issues. The biggest drawback was removing the dried putty from the tube, with each use. May break it back out and perform more experiments.
Scarred
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Posted: Thursday, November 29, 2018 - 03:53 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

Automotive body putty here as well for the larger gaps. To thin it down, I mix in a touch of Tamiya extra thin cement.



I thought Bondo is water-based.?



Bondo glazing putty smells a lot like Squadron putty.
Kevlar06
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Posted: Thursday, November 29, 2018 - 03:59 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text


Quoted Text

Automotive body putty here as well for the larger gaps. To thin it down, I mix in a touch of Tamiya extra thin cement.



I thought Bondo is water-based.?



Bondo glazing putty smells a lot like Squadron putty.



But Bondo is much smoother than Squadron, and it's tube life is great-- I've been using the same tube for ten years now-- lucky if I can get 1 year from a tube of Green Putty once opened. Bondo is definitely NOT water based. Another advantage of Bondo is it can be used on more than just plastic-- it can be used as a filler and putty on resin and metal as well.
VR, Russ
Trackedon
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Queensland, Australia
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Posted: Thursday, November 29, 2018 - 11:02 AM UTC
Thanks for that great insight into the range of products, its most helpful.
kevinekstrom
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Posted: Saturday, December 22, 2018 - 08:22 AM UTC
for small injector pin holes I strictly use CA, the key is not to let it set-up to full hardness. Start working it right away. I use styrene rods and CA for large gaps. Same principal as straight-up CA ; start working it right away. I rarely use putty for anything, the finish never seems as smooth as using styrene and CA.
CMOT
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ARMORAMA
#406
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Posted: Saturday, December 22, 2018 - 08:46 AM UTC
I am a fan of perfect plastic putty from Deluxe.
drakblau
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Posted: Thursday, December 27, 2018 - 05:11 PM UTC
I use CA mixed with baby powder. The baby powder keeps the CA at a good sandable hardness without it becoming too hard. I use it for medium to large gaps and rebuilding parts.

For tiny blemishes Mr Surfacer is nice.
Removed by original poster on 01/23/19 - 08:28:11 (GMT).
Removed by original poster on 01/23/19 - 08:34:18 (GMT).