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Cars: Muscle Cars
60's & 70's Classics
AMT new tool Chrysler 300C (commissioned)
Headhunter506
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Posted: Sunday, February 17, 2019 - 05:25 AM UTC

Quoted Text

By the original finish, I should have them done in BMF, but the space is too tight for my modeling knife, and probably I'm gonna end up picking them with a silver felt pen



Use a fresh No.11 blade. You'll be able to get into the spots near the windows with no difficulty. Also, when using BMF, having a mechanical pencil with 0.5 mm lead around is handy. The pencil lead is small enough to fit into any small crevices, allowing you to burnish the foil so it conforms to all of the details. When foiling side trim, scribing around the perimeter of the trim to create a recess will allow you to, in effect, tuck the foil into the recess and give the foiled trim a more realistic appearance.Personally like the stainless steel PE scribers from HQT Tools.

You can use the mechanical pencil to burnish the foil around the outer edges. The eraser on the mechanical pencil can be used to press the foil into scripts, badges and such without damaging these details.

As far as spraying clear over Alclad, you'll only end up with a dull, non-reflective silver paint finish. Read HERE for a detailed explanation.

For rechroming bumpers, grilles and wheels, forget about Molotow. The best product available to reproduce a mirror-like chrome finish is Alsa Corp.'s Easy Chrome. Unlike Molotow, which is an ink, or Metalizer finishes, Easy Chrome is durable and won't rub off. It can be clearcoated and used on 1:1 car/truck rims. It can be brushed on; but, the best way to apply it is with an airbrush, in light mist coats. You can spray a clear coat over it, which is not necessary; yet, the clear will not flatten the particles and dull the finish. The price for the 2 oz. kit might seem high; however, a little goes a long way. You can rechrome anywhere from 100-150 bumpers/grilles and wheels. Considering how much it would cost to have that number of items rechromed by a replater, it's very cost-effective. You can read more about it's use on models HERE.

BTW, this is not a "new tool" kit. It's a straight reissue of the 1999-vintage AMT/ERTL Chrysler 300C with updated box art.
Hwa-Rang
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Posted: Sunday, February 17, 2019 - 06:40 PM UTC
Incredible shine on that hood Gabriel.
Szmann
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Posted: Monday, February 18, 2019 - 05:22 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Use a fresh No.11 blade. You'll be able to get into the spots near the windows with no difficulty. Also, when using BMF, having a mechanical pencil with 0.5 mm lead around is handy. The pencil lead is small enough to fit into any small crevices, allowing you to burnish the foil so it conforms to all of the details. When foiling side trim, scribing around the perimeter of the trim to create a recess will allow you to, in effect, tuck the foil into the recess and give the foiled trim a more realistic appearance.Personally like the stainless steel PE scribers from HQT Tools.


I use both .3mm mechanical pencil and rounded toothpick for burnishing. Still I need to practice more BMF application - I don't really feel comfortable with it


Quoted Text


As far as spraying clear over Alclad, you'll only end up with a dull, non-reflective silver paint finish. Read HERE for a detailed explanation.


The effect is well known to me from experience. I have considered the trade acceptable because I wanted my model to stand some rough handling during polishing and windows installation.


Quoted Text


For rechroming bumpers, grilles and wheels, forget about Molotow. The best product available to reproduce a mirror-like chrome finish is Alsa Corp.'s Easy Chrome. Unlike Molotow, which is an ink, or Metalizer finishes, Easy Chrome is durable and won't rub off. It can be clearcoated and used on 1:1 car/truck rims. It can be brushed on; but, the best way to apply it is with an airbrush, in light mist coats. You can spray a clear coat over it, which is not necessary; yet, the clear will not flatten the particles and dull the finish. The price for the 2 oz. kit might seem high; however, a little goes a long way. You can rechrome anywhere from 100-150 bumpers/grilles and wheels. Considering how much it would cost to have that number of items rechromed by a replater, it's very cost-effective. You can read more about it's use on models HERE.


I thought I know a thing or two about metallics until now this one indicated by you looks amazing. The price is rather prohibitive, but if the results are like the ones indicated in the demos, then is fantastic and probably worth in the long run.


Quoted Text


BTW, this is not a "new tool" kit. It's a straight reissue of the 1999-vintage AMT/ERTL Chrysler 300C with updated box art.


I've noted that at the beginning of the blogging. Correctly, is a re-tooled kit. Some parts backdate in 2006 (the bottom plate), others are of 2018 issue (the body).

Thank you for the useful links and info - much appreciated.
Gabriel
Szmann
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Posted: Monday, February 18, 2019 - 05:26 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Incredible shine on that hood Gabriel.



Thanks, Jesper!
Yes, 2K did it again!

Gabriel
ChurchSTSV
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Posted: Monday, February 18, 2019 - 05:36 AM UTC
Speaking of chrome, have you ever tried Krylon metallic for body trim? I got a Molotow pen but this stuff:



That is just sloped on there over some Tamiya semi gloss black.

Also, a sneak preview of the exhaust I am working on.
Szmann
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Posted: Monday, February 18, 2019 - 05:44 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Speaking of chrome, have you ever tried Krylon metallic for body trim? I got a Molotow pen but this stuff:

That is just sloped on there over some Tamiya semi gloss black.

Also, a sneak preview of the exhaust I am working on.



Hi, Charlie!
I have tried Krylon Chrome Silver over the entire body as base-coat for candy colors. It looks good, but under the clear coat has a tendency to dull out.

Your Molotov experiment looks good. Probably you need to be patient now for it to dry properly (a few days maybe). I would say it looks very good, but let's see how it behaves with handling / coating.

Gabriel
Szmann
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Posted: Monday, February 18, 2019 - 06:22 AM UTC
UPDATE

The hood fully restored, polished and dry-fitted:


I fully need some better polishing compound - Novus cannot cope with resin's hardness:


The re-worked wheels attached and aligned to the chassis. The exterior and interior of the wheels are not glued together and there is some place for further alignment / re-positioning:





As anticipated, the plated parts don't fit properly, because the plating is applied over the seams. I filled the small gaps with clear glue; a wash will be applied, simulating rubber gaskets, even if the original doesn't have them:


The same goes for the front light buckets. The chromed rims need to be re-done, and the glassed added. The grille will receive a black wash to enhance details.



The liquid washer pouch was done with a homemade decal, adapted. I had to under-paint the pouch with yellow but some 2K creeped in and the paint just doesn't stick over the glassy surface. A light wash will follow. Under magnification, it can be read: "Jiffy Jet" and the Mopar sign:


The radiator wall with the radiator and the klaxons added, same for the battery and the compressor, all with reasonable detail from AMT

Some detail worked in the inside; still a wash to be added and the lamps to be picked up with off white and gloss "lenses":


Still a few exterior details to be added, and the build is reaching its intended end...
Joel_W
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Posted: Monday, February 18, 2019 - 08:49 AM UTC
Gabriel,
Excellent progress for sure.

The redone area on the hood came out perfect. I've always had issues with the pre-chromed parts, hence I usually strip all of them and apply Alcad2 Chrome with a gloss Black base. This way I can test fit and adjust before chroming.

No questions about it, as you nailed the inside passenger compartment roof.

As for an excellent polishing 3 part system, plus wax, I love the Gravity system. If you need something stronger then those, I've used various polishes that I detail my Hyundai Coupe with, up to polishing Compound but never Rubbing compound.

Joel


Headhunter506
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Posted: Monday, February 18, 2019 - 12:32 PM UTC

Quoted Text

but if the results are like the ones indicated in the demos, then is fantastic and probably worth in the long run.



The results are exactly as seen and advertised. I can't post any photos of the re-chromed bumper and grille of the Johan 1960 Desoto Adventurer I've been working on because I've packed my stuff in prep for a move; but, once I get settled in at the new digs, I'll post pics of the results. I absolutely guarantee that you'll be more than impressed. BTW, excellent work on this Mopar.
Merlin
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Posted: Tuesday, February 19, 2019 - 09:03 AM UTC
Hi Gabriel

I love this thread! For a novice car modeller like me, there is just so much useful info and tips to learn from.

I've got my sights set on an American late '50s or early '60s classic at some point in the near future. They always turn heads whenever we see them over here in the UK. There are even a few running on the Isle of Wight that often appear at charity events, so I'll try to grab some shots if I can.

Admittedly, that could be the cue for our Stateside members to say "What the **** have those Brits done to our cars!!", but I always think a car is meant to be driven - and if that means a few "tweaks" to keep it running that aren't strictly original... I'll forgive that. The alternative is often a static museum piece.

All the best

Rowan
Szmann
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Posted: Tuesday, February 19, 2019 - 03:24 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Hi Gabriel

I love this thread! For a novice car modeller like me, there is just so much useful info and tips to learn from.


Hi, Rowan! Thanks for stopping by!
Well, the fundamentals are pretty much the same. Joel proved it: his transition to auto modelling was quite painless and swift - now basically he is setting new standards with every new build
From all other branches, I think the aircraft modellers have the upper hand: if you have managed that impeccable metallic finish on a Sabre, then painting a transmission is a kid's play. And after you detailed a cockpit or a radio station on 72nd scale, then detailing an engine bay should be piece of cake!


Quoted Text


I've got my sights set on an American late '50s or early '60s classic at some point in the near future. They always turn heads whenever we see them over here in the UK. There are even a few running on the Isle of Wight that often appear at charity events, so I'll try to grab some shots if I can.

Admittedly, that could be the cue for our Stateside members to say "What the **** have those Brits done to our cars!!", but I always think a car is meant to be driven - and if that means a few "tweaks" to keep it running that aren't strictly original... I'll forgive that. The alternative is often a static museum piece.



I am new into American cars as well: I was for years a complete devotee to King Volkswagen and Queen Mercedes but slowly I started discovering the "ridiculous", "monstrous" and "senseless" American muscle myself as being quite interesting, and I even have a few sympathies among them, as deSoto or Edsel, with Duesenberg as a very distinguished princess.

I can only envy you for having this sort of events in UK - here in SXM the best thing I can attend is the Carnival not really related to cars

Absolutely, some pics will be gold for references. Apparently AutoModeler have lost the good habit of making walk-arounds, unfortunately.

Looking forward to your first car building,
Gabriel
Szmann
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Posted: Tuesday, February 19, 2019 - 03:39 PM UTC
UPDATE: Connecting the last dots

I was anticipating I will finish the build this evening, but it wasn't to be!
First of, I forgot to dip the back windshield in Pledge and it was in worst condition than the front one from the bag. So it went in Alien Blood but wasn't ready yet. Setting the mirrors is not easy also: AMT had the "brilliant" idea to make the injection gate right in the middle of the "glass", fir both dash mirror and the side one. Well, I cleaned them but I ran too late for airbrushing.
I have installed the chromed parts and applied the wash to the radiator. And I couldn't resist for a dry fit (not brilliant idea, but I need to know if everything goes the right way and apparently it does):










Still a few details to be ironed out, but minuscule, a good polish for cleanliness after installing the windows and it will pretty much done!

Cheers!
Gabriel
AussieReg
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Posted: Tuesday, February 19, 2019 - 04:34 PM UTC
Looking very nice there Gabriel. I can't wait to see the final "glamour shots" once the finishing touches are applied.

Such a distinctive front on the 300C, stands right out from the crowd for sure!

Cheers, D
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Posted: Tuesday, February 19, 2019 - 05:10 PM UTC
I gotta admit that you created a beauty. I'm a sucker for a blue car and I really like that color. It looks good all put together.

I used to use Blue Magic metal polish to take scratches out of windows and canopies and to shine and polish clearcoats on airliner kits. But those were pretty soft finishes. I had a high end car wax that I finished with to get rid off any lingering haze or swirls. Never used novus but I'm almost tempted to get a couple of car kits just to try it and try using nail polish for some exotic color.
Hwa-Rang
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Posted: Tuesday, February 19, 2019 - 06:35 PM UTC
Looks absolutely amazing Gabriel.
Cosimodo
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Posted: Tuesday, February 19, 2019 - 10:14 PM UTC
Well Gabriel, it took me 50 mins to read this thru from the start. It's incredible in what you have achieved in under two months! I am sorry I have missed this one. You have done an amazing build and I am sure the customer will be rapt.

cheers
Michael
Joel_W
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Posted: Wednesday, February 20, 2019 - 06:32 AM UTC
Gabriel,
The test fit looks perfect. I can't wait to see it finished. the owner should really love it.

Joel
Szmann
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Posted: Wednesday, February 20, 2019 - 01:01 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Looking very nice there Gabriel. I can't wait to see the final "glamour shots" once the finishing touches are applied.

Such a distinctive front on the 300C, stands right out from the crowd for sure!

Cheers, D



Thanks, D.! Yes, the end of this build is tantalizingly close. I decided to change the background and the lightning in my photo tent specially for this build. I am curious and fretting

Gabriel
Szmann
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Posted: Wednesday, February 20, 2019 - 01:09 PM UTC

Quoted Text

I gotta admit that you created a beauty. I'm a sucker for a blue car and I really like that color. It looks good all put together.


Thanks, Patrick!


Quoted Text


I used to use Blue Magic metal polish to take scratches out of windows and canopies and to shine and polish clearcoats on airliner kits. But those were pretty soft finishes. I had a high end car wax that I finished with to get rid off any lingering haze or swirls. Never used novus but I'm almost tempted to get a couple of car kits just to try it and try using nail polish for some exotic color.



I eventually used McGuire's polishing compound - the only "pro" I could find at the local convenience store, until my Tamiya compounds will arrive from Canada. I'm into researching the problem now: I'm relatively new to 2K myself, and I never encountered such a stubborn resistance. On regular urethanes, Novus 2 works just fine. I'll try to find some professional products to my local auto store(s).

Cheers!
Gabriel
Szmann
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Posted: Wednesday, February 20, 2019 - 01:11 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Looks absolutely amazing Gabriel.



Thanks, Jesper! Although was built piece by piece by myself, I had a "revelation" seeing it completed. Yes, she's a gorgeous girl!

Gabriel
Szmann
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Posted: Wednesday, February 20, 2019 - 01:18 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Well Gabriel, it took me 50 mins to read this thru from the start. It's incredible in what you have achieved in under two months! I am sorry I have missed this one. You have done an amazing build and I am sure the customer will be rapt.

cheers
Michael



Welcome back, Michael!
I try to do something every day, unless I'm dead-tired from the work. Even then, I will watch some Jay Leno's Garage episode... I'm incurably ill with the "modelling bug".
The customer input was positive so far, and he told me he "may have another one or two for me" - that will make 13 pre-commissioned builds... and my own stash gets constipated

Gabriel
Szmann
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Posted: Wednesday, February 20, 2019 - 01:25 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Gabriel,
The test fit looks perfect. I can't wait to see it finished. the owner should really love it.

Joel



I have to credit AMT for this one, Joel. The underside / interior slides effortlessly forward and the two pins at the back just click in. Easy and secure, minimal friction to the sides. Yes, the owner seems happy. My only worry now is with the shipping.

Gabriel
Szmann
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Posted: Wednesday, February 20, 2019 - 01:45 PM UTC
UPDATE - Same old AMT

However carefully I've tried to undo the body, I still moved the back bumper; no damage - just makes it easy to re-assemble the car.

I had the windshield ready - the back window still drying so I decided to install it, just to have it dry for tomorrow's final assembly. Prior to assembly, I've done the edges black to resemble some rubber gasket, but mostly to forbid the entering of the light from the sides, which amplifies the thick appearance - and, boy, these windows are hefty!


And then the disappointment: as the AMT we know, same old AMT, the windows won't fit. The curvature of the window and the one of the roof are quite poor match. Fortunately, the side small windows fit quite good, otherwise I would be now in quite some trouble. As with the chromed parts, I had to add a "gasket" of Micro Krystal Klear to make sure there are no gaps, especially in the upper side (the sloped angle of the windshield's frame doesn't correspond either):


The fit is tight eventually, but the difference in curvature can be made quite clear at the corners :


... and now my omission. Revisiting the pictures I took yesterday, I had the feeling that something isn't right, but I couldn't really point it out. Then I see it: the intake grilles for brake cooling weren't chromed. To avoid further problems, I dismantled the front bumper as well, and picked the grilles with my silver pen:


Other than that, I sprayed with Alclad chrome the troublesome mirrors and the trunk badge and everything shall be ready for the big day: tomorrow's graduation ceremony!

Gabriel
Headhunter506
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Posted: Wednesday, February 20, 2019 - 07:20 PM UTC
There is a solution to the ill-fitting windshield/backlite problem:

Replacement windshield heat formed

It's simple and takes a few minutes to make new glass. I've used this method to replace/fabricate windshields/backlites (rear windows for those unfamiliar with the term) for Revellogram '59/'60 Impala HTs, the Trumpeter '60 Pontiac Bonneville HT, the old Revell '62 Dodges and Plymouths and for a slew of Johan Mopars, all of the aforementioned kits having issues with proper glass fit. The heat formed glass is thin, crystal clear with no distortion and, most importantly, flexible enough to fit the contours of the window frames without leaving unsightly gaps.

You can even build your own vacuform machine to custom make parts as seen HERE and HERE. You can find more info and build plans using Google. It's easy and can make a big difference in completing a kit that looks like a winner or an exercise in futility.
Headhunter506
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Posted: Wednesday, February 20, 2019 - 08:04 PM UTC

Quoted Text

the intake grilles for brake cooling weren't chromed.



The areas under the headlamps to which you are referring aren't brake cooling grilles. Those are turn signal housings:



and the chrome molding wraps around the fender.

BTW, I'm not trying to nitpick at or disparage your work, which is outstanding, Gabriel. I'm only making observations and attempting to offer constructive comments to assist you in making this commission build something the client will appreciate. If you feel that I'm offering unsolicited and/or unwanted advise, let me know and I'll refrain from posting further comments.