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Paint & Finish
For automotive paint and finishing topics.
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wheel & tire painting
southpier
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Posted: Wednesday, July 31, 2019 - 05:03 AM UTC

Quoted Text

... the discussion is back...




I've edited the original post in the interest of clarity.
southpier
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Posted: Wednesday, July 31, 2019 - 05:01 AM UTC

Quoted Text

... “wheel & tire painting” … always eager to learn.




no harm/ no foul.

knowledge is cumulative and comes from a myriad of sources.
Joel_W
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Posted: Wednesday, July 31, 2019 - 03:58 AM UTC
So the discussion is back to civilian tires and wheels, which is what I thought it originally was.

The vast majority of the builds are in either of 4 scales: 1/12, 1/20, 1/24, & 1/25. I've yet to see tires and wheels molded as one piece. There are smaller scales such as 1/32 where they may be a single piece. Is this what you're referring to?

Joel
justsendit
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Posted: Wednesday, July 31, 2019 - 03:00 AM UTC
“Does not pay attention in class.” ... Guess I should have gone to the top of the page to review the original question before hastily inserting my advise. I was thinking AFV. Sincere apologies for my part in derailing this thread. Now let’s get the “wheel & tire painting” topic back on track. I am always eager to learn.

Happy modeling!🍺
—mike
southpier
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Posted: Tuesday, July 30, 2019 - 11:27 PM UTC
I failed to mention in the first post/ query that I usually build civilian vehicles. I don't lean too heavily towards weathering unless it's a light commercial vehicle.

transitioning from a "model cars" background, it's interesting how the same hobby in a different venue has a variety of presumptions. something of which I will be more aware!
165thspc
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Posted: Tuesday, July 30, 2019 - 08:14 PM UTC
Since you are preshading the car body in a dark color I see no issue with the wheel rims not matching. They should come out nearly the same shade/color. However it all depends on if one is choosing to do this preshading treatment in the first place.

I do not. I choose to build up my paint colors in the same manor that nature does: first primer, then paint, flat clear coat, washes and finally pastels. (The last two to represent dirt, grime and dust.)
justsendit
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Posted: Tuesday, July 30, 2019 - 11:57 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

… isn't the rim color going to come out darker than that on the rest of the vehicle...



the wheels look good, but I would be hard pressed to convince they are not noticeably darker.


There was a point where I could have gone more heavy-handed when airbrushing the rim color to obtain a 100% color match, but I chose not to (refer to pre-shading explanation above). ... I now yield.

Cheers!🍺
—mike
southpier
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Posted: Tuesday, July 30, 2019 - 11:49 AM UTC

Quoted Text

… isn't the rim color going to come out darker than that on the rest of the vehicle...




the wheels look good, but I would be hard pressed to convince they are not noticeably darker.
justsendit
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Posted: Tuesday, July 30, 2019 - 11:38 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Mike if you are painting the tire color first isn't the rim color going to come out darker than that on the rest of the vehicle itself?

Also if you are having to hand brush more tire color on to touch up the overspray it doesn't seem like this would be much of a time saver.

Not arguing but it just seems like at least as much work.


That was an earlier concern of mine, but the results have been really good. Keeping pre-shading in mind, the vehicle was first primed with Vallejo German Panzer Grey Primer (73.603).


The body color is Vallejo Desert Yellow (70.977). After final weathering, (not shown here) the colors should tie-in together even more. Of course, as with any color, milage may vary.


The hand-brushing part goes fairly quickly. Good brushes help.

Cheers!🍺
—mike
165thspc
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Posted: Tuesday, July 30, 2019 - 11:02 AM UTC
Mike if you are painting the tire color first isn't the rim color going to come out darker than that on the rest of the vehicle itself?

Also if you are having to hand brush more tire color on to touch up the overspray it doesn't seem like this would be much of a time saver.

Not arguing but it just seems like at least as much work.
justsendit
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Posted: Tuesday, July 30, 2019 - 10:24 AM UTC
For what it's worth... I scrounged-up a circle template from my old drafting days and found this wheel-mask method to be the most effective for me:

1. Airbrush the entire wheel with preferred tire color... in this case, thinned Vallejo Dark Rubber (70.306).
2. Tape a circle template positioned as close as possible to center — quicker to do this part hand-held (not shown here).


3. Airbrush vehicle color allowing some of the darker tire color to show through for shadow effect. There will be over-spray — not to worry though.


4. Hand-paint over-spray areas with the tire color using a fine-tip brush.


This process goes so quickly that I don't even bother with DEF.Model's included wheel masks.

Cheers!🍺
—mike
165thspc
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Posted: Tuesday, July 30, 2019 - 03:17 AM UTC
One final note: When using this method I always "prime" the tire portion with whatever spray body color I am using especially when painting the lite colored resin tires. I get much better adhesion when using the pre-thinned air brush paint plus better coverage and opacity as well.
165thspc
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Posted: Monday, July 29, 2019 - 07:12 AM UTC

Quoted Text

thanks. I like the idea of using "airbrush" paint to avoid clogging the treads.



Outstanding - I didn't even think to mention that fact but as you can see in the examples the thinned air brush paint lets all the tread detail show through.
165thspc
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Posted: Monday, July 29, 2019 - 07:07 AM UTC
Two other threads roughly on a similar topic however these are regarding real rubber tires:

Shiny Vinyl Tires:
http://www.armorama.com/modules.php?op=modload&name=SquawkBox&file=index&req=viewtopic&topic_id=276889#2338366

AFV Club Rubber Wheels Question:
http://www.armorama.com/modules.php?op=modload&name=SquawkBox&file=index&req=viewtopic&topic_id=277563
southpier
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Posted: Monday, July 29, 2019 - 06:49 AM UTC

Quoted Text

. . . just spray paint the wheel/tire assembly the chosen body color then brush paint the tire...




thanks. I like the idea of using "airbrush" paint to avoid clogging the treads.
165thspc
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Posted: Monday, July 29, 2019 - 06:27 AM UTC
Usually there is a raised rim on the edge where the tire meets the wheel drum. I just spray paint the wheel/tire assembly the chosen body color then brush paint the tire in my chosen shade of black.

Myself I use an air brush quality "Burnt Metal", slightly metallic shade of black paint. The pre-thinned paint flows freely and smoothly from the brush right up to that raised rim and produces, to my eye, a near perfect shade of slightly oxidized, silvery gray-black, duplicating the tone of an older, used rubber tire.


One example shown here using the Tamiya Steyr with their one piece molded tan plastic tires. A lot of heavy weathering washes applied on this one:


A second example this time using one piece, AM molded, cream colored resin tires with little or no weathering:
southpier
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Posted: Monday, July 29, 2019 - 05:14 AM UTC
sorry for any confusion, but my concern was painting the wheel & tire molded together piece.
ChurchSTSV
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Posted: Monday, July 29, 2019 - 04:33 AM UTC
I ordered a circle template from China for less than a $1. From how-to's I have watches, I plan on taping the wheel to the appropriate sized circle in order to make white walls.

I haven't had a chance to try it yet, but its seems pretty simple. Once they are painted, I'll give them a shot of Dullcote™ and pop in the wheels.
southpier
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Posted: Monday, July 29, 2019 - 04:25 AM UTC
thank you. helps me from trying to decide among ALL the options!
Joel_W
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Posted: Monday, July 29, 2019 - 02:31 AM UTC

Gunze Sangyo Mr. Masking Sol R 20ml Liquid is cuttable but costs about $9/bottle from Sprue brothers. Well worth it. The cheaper version really isn't meant to be cut to shape

the circle cutter I use is also from Sprue Brothers, and has worked very well the few times I've used it. Flex-I-File Super Cutting Compass which costs about $20.

Joel
southpier
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Posted: Monday, July 29, 2019 - 01:29 AM UTC
thanks for the alternate methods.

Q: any suggestion for the circle cutter and/ or masking fluid?

sailing in uncharted waters here!
Joel_W
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Posted: Monday, July 29, 2019 - 12:51 AM UTC
Sounds like you're referring to painting AVF wheels/tires in 1/35 scale. But for what it's worth I would use my circle cutter and the proper width masking tape. I'd cut out a circle the diameter of the outside of the tire, then cut the inside diameter in that circle. what I'm left with is a mask for the tire.

The trick is to a have a decent circle cutter, and a new, sharp blade.

There is a alternate method which works as well, and that's using a liquid masking medium. Like everything else in our hobby, there's more then one type. You want to use the type that you can cut so you'll have a sharp edge.

Paint the tire, then when dry, coat the tire with the masking medium. When dry carefully trim it along the wheel lip.

Honestly, the masking method is easier, quicker, and there's zero chance of screwing up the masking tape mask.


Joel
southpier
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Posted: Sunday, July 28, 2019 - 10:27 AM UTC
after a mind numbing number of responses to my "search", I have concluded that there are two approaches to wheel & tire painting for an assembly which has been molded in one piece.

#1 - paint the tire and then paint the wheel.

#2. - paint the wheel and then paint the tire.

when using method #1, does the tire color affect the wheel color rendering it significantly different in shade than the body (given the intention they are to match as on a civilian vehicle).


when using method #2, what is the safest method of masking the wheel?


can anyone recommend a template (other than drafting) perhaps hobby-centric that has a plethora of circle diameters applicable to 1:35 scale wheels?

thanks