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Painting: Painting with Oils
Discuss Oil painting techniques.
Hosted by Craig Whitaker
Oil painting video on line
mongo_mel
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Posted: Tuesday, May 22, 2007 - 07:41 AM UTC
Hi,
A little whiile back I was asked by Kostantin (Shturmovik) if I could help him out with somthing. He had seen my short video on stippling and was wondering if I could make a video on blending oil paint. I had just bought a new digital camera that would shoot video as well so I thought I'd give it a try.
I ended up shooting almost 15 minutes of video with narration.
The file was too big to email so I burned a copy on DVD and mailed it to him. Another member, Laurent (Asmodai1973) asked me for a copy as well. He also offered to convert it to a format with a more manageable file size and to then post it on line for me.
Here is the result...
Video

It's a basic demonstration on applying and blending shadows and highlights along with using the stippling technique.
I hope it ends up being useful to you too.
Craig
grimreaper
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Posted: Tuesday, May 22, 2007 - 08:54 AM UTC
Craig,
Great video.
I finally got my Tarleton figure primed and was about ready to start painting, so this for me is perfect timing.
Question: did you smooth out the base coat at all before you laid in the shadow color for the deep folds?
Best regards,
Gary
Tarok
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Posted: Tuesday, May 22, 2007 - 10:24 AM UTC
Hi Craig,

Thanks. A very useful video.

Do you know if it can be downloaded from this site? I'd love to have a copy on my HD for quick reference - I still use your previous 2 videos from time to time

Then a "technical" question... how did you position/setup your camera when doing this video?

Rudi
mongo_mel
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Posted: Tuesday, May 22, 2007 - 04:10 PM UTC
Hi guys,
Gary, if I understand your question correctly, then yes I did. I applied the base color in oil paint and stippled it. I do this just to make certain that I had enough paint for good coverage and that it was spread out fairly evenly before proceeding with the shadowing.
Rudi, I can't seem to figure out how to download the video either. I'll email Laurant to see if he can email his converted version to me. Then I'll forward it to you.
I mounted my digital camera on a floor mount tripod and placed it between myself and my work bench. So my arms are wrapped around the camera and tripod and my head is just to the right of the camera while I'm painting and talking. That's why the bust tends to float out of frame once in a while. I had to keep looking back at the big screen on the back of the camera to check on the position of the piece.
Not too awkward
Craig
Tarok
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Posted: Tuesday, May 22, 2007 - 04:33 PM UTC
Thanks Craig
grimreaper
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Posted: Tuesday, May 22, 2007 - 04:52 PM UTC
Thanks Craig,
Great video. I thought that you might have as it looked so even.
Dare I say, "Keep'em coming".
Would like to see how you do faces and eyes.
Your "set-up" I thought was great. Easy to listen to-great sound quality.
Thanks much!!!!!!!
Gary
Grumpyoldman
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Posted: Tuesday, May 22, 2007 - 05:14 PM UTC
Nice job Craig.
MSGsummit
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Posted: Tuesday, May 22, 2007 - 05:31 PM UTC
Craig,
Thanks so much for the video brother! The techniques you have shared here led to my adventure into oil paints. Your video really helped me to understand the wet on wet technique. Any chance of any more how-to's? Anyway...Thanks again Craig, awesome job!
povolo6
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Posted: Wednesday, May 23, 2007 - 12:21 AM UTC
Craig,
This is very usefull for me. Never got it explained so clear.
Question: 1: It seems to me that you don't use very expensive W&N no 7
2: What type brush you use there for the stippeling at the end of
the shading or highlighting. Looks some poly brush.
3: What numbers of brushes do you use.

Hope you can answer it...

marc
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Posted: Wednesday, May 23, 2007 - 01:44 AM UTC
Craig that's indeed a great video for everyone that needs to understand 100% how blending is done in oils. Thanks for sharing it with us.

Xenofon
MarkusE
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Posted: Wednesday, May 23, 2007 - 02:19 AM UTC
Hello Craig,

I“m no oil-painter (this times only a sculptor), but I must thank you for this great video !!!

I think this is more than just a big help for every oil-painter !!! SUPER work !!!

Keep it up,
Markus

lscrep
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Posted: Wednesday, May 23, 2007 - 02:50 AM UTC
Loved the demo as a newbie to figure painting this was really clear and highly informative. Love to see more like this
Wayne
mongo_mel
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Posted: Wednesday, May 23, 2007 - 04:52 AM UTC
Thanks everyone. I really appreciate what you've said here.

Gary, Art and Wayne
I guess I c ould try one for the face but I think it might be too difficult What you saw on the first one was opretty simplistic and you saw how long it was. II can't imagine how big a file a face one would be. Let me think about how it could be done. See if I can think up a way to make it work.


Marc,
When you see the Cad Yellow being applied for the highlighting, that's a WN Series 7 brush. But I don't really use them for blending as that's pretty tough on them. Most of the brushes I'm using there are WN, just not the high end ones. The blending down in the folds is a synthetic hair and the one for the bigger areas is a sable brush. That big one is a brush I found at my hobby shop. No brand name that I can see on the handle any more. But yyes, it's a synthetic hair. The hairs are stiff enough to remain straigh all the way to the ends but they are flexible eough that they don't mess up the paint during stippling.
As for sizes, the Series 7 's I use rabge from 0 to 000, either the regular or the mini's. The regular sable's range from 0 to 4 and the synthetic's about the same. Remember that I pretty much onl;y do large sacle figs and busts so the bigger ones might not be any good on a 54mm figure.
oilpainter
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Posted: Saturday, September 01, 2007 - 06:07 AM UTC
Hi Craig,
I've been searching out your very detailed how-to-do pics (especially shading/highlighting faces) and am very happy with this instructional video, too. It's def a big help for a newbie in oils. (I've tried my luck in airbrushing and have some good results, but am not good when it comes to details on faces).

I have one question: is the base coat (also on the faces) dry when you start the shades and highlights? Or is the brush that you work the paint into the creases just water wet? I know it's working wet in wet, so I actually assume that the base coat is not dry but then I'd assume that the colours mix to a new colour like they would in acrylics, wouldn't they? Sorry, if that is a somewhat stupid question, but I'm so totally new to oils. I just have this feeling that this medium could work much better for me than acrylics for what I want to achieve.
Thanks, Attilio


PS: There is a way to download that video to one's own PC. I'm not sure if you want me to post it here Craig, so I'll keep the info to myself until you say otherwise or want me to send you a pm with how-to details.


PPS: There is another small question: What exactly is the T. white that you refer to in your "Mixing Oil Paints" article, for instance in the description for the mix for distressed brown leather ? (Titanium White you've spelt out further down).

Thanks a bunch!
mongo_mel
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Posted: Saturday, September 01, 2007 - 02:30 PM UTC
Hi Attilio,
Thanks for the nice comments
I'll try to answer your questions. But if I get it qrong, please feel free to try me again.
In the video, the base green color you see on the piece is wet oil paint. When I add the shadow paint, it does change the color. The trick is to be sure that the color you're adding changes it the right way. For me, I usually try to have at least a touch of the shadow color already in the base color mix. But this usually isn't a problem because the shadow color can be just a darker shade of the base color. I hope that makes sense to you.

About the video, it's too big to email and I don't know how to download from that site. I had burned a copy of the video on to a DVD and mailed it to Paulo. He was able to load it on to that site for me. He also played with it and was able to reduce the file, break it into several parts and email them back to me.
Unfortunately, I can't get them to play on my computer
But if you can get it to download, that's great to hear.
And I have no problem with you posting the directions here for doing so.
In fact, if you do, I'll post a link back to here on the other sites that I have this on.
Thanks for sharing the info.
The T. White is just my lazy abbreviation for Titanium White
Craig
oilpainter
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Posted: Saturday, September 01, 2007 - 11:37 PM UTC
Thanks for the fast reply, Craig. You explained very well, I got the picture and will get started next week when I'm more sure about which paints to get!

I'll be going for Winsor & Newton, as I had already great results with their acrylics. Have you or somebody reading here ever used the W&N Artisan oil colours that mix with water? Are they easier to use (no turpentine needed? maybe dry a little quicker?) but still achieve very good results in figure painting? Or should I go for the high quality stuff right away (if no thinning is required).

And I have a couple more (hopefully last) questions:
- do you use all the colours straight from the tube or mix with a medium and - if so - roughly, at what percentage?
- Do you apply the next colour up straight after the first or is it better to wait some time with the next application and how long for?


The above video download goes as follows:
-----------------------------------------------------------
go to this site to grab the video by entering the video link http:// www.dailymotion.com/video/x21m4l_miniature-oil-blending-by-craig-whi_creation (delete the space I entered before www to adjust the link)
It'll download as a flv file onto your chosen area of your PC. Now you can either play it back with the free flv player in the above link or convert it to an avi file that plays in any player by using any free "flv to avi converter" that you can google.
Voilą, there's your very own copy of the file (hopefully).

Thanks again for all your help!
Attilio
oilpainter
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Posted: Monday, September 03, 2007 - 08:54 AM UTC
OK, I've roamed through the forum some more and found the answers to my questions regarding how to use the paints for faces, whereby an acrylic undercoat suits me (and my airbrush) just perfect.

I might start another thread on experience with different brands of oil paints or rather first roam some more through the vast pool of experience on this forum and see if the issue has already been addressed.

Attilio

PS: Is there really no search function installed yet???
Tarok
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Posted: Monday, September 03, 2007 - 05:10 PM UTC

Quoted Text

PS: Is there really no search function installed yet???



Use the Google search at the top of the page.
mongo_mel
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Posted: Monday, September 03, 2007 - 11:06 PM UTC
Hi Attillo,
Sorry for not replying sooner. It was a 3 day holiday weekend here in the US and I didn't spend too much time at the computer.

I've never used any of the WN water soluable oil paints so I can't help you out there. I like to get the artist line from WN if the price isn't too outrageous. They do seem to be better in pigment quality to me.

I almost never thin my oil paints. I prefer to use them thick so that they don't run when I put them on the figure. About the the only time I thin is when I use them for washes.

About your last question...I hope I understand you correctly here
When the base color has been applied and is stiil wet, I apply the shadows color first and then the highlight color right after that. What I want is for all three colors to blend together so that there is a flow of color change from lowest to highest. Then I let this dry before I go back and add my secondary shadows. Then I let this dry before I add my secondary highlights. Both of these steps are just to reenforce the shadows and highlights and usually don't come in contact with the base color but rather just go on top of the shadows and highlights. Also, you don't want to completely cover the original shadows and highlights. You just want to reenforce them in the deepest shadows and highest highlight points.
I hope I got that right for you.
Also, if the drying time of the oils is a problem for you, you might want to make yourself a drying box. It really does speed the drying time for most oils so that you can work on them within 12-24 hours.
Basically, the drying box I made is just a wood box big enough to hold a few figures and a light bulb in a fixture. The heat from the bulb speeds up the drying time. I usually use a 60 watt bulb with no harm to either resin or white metal figures. If you use the Google search that Rudi mentioned you 'll fine a bunch of threads about them. there should be one there on how I made mine, including a simple drawing of it.
Let me know if there's anything else I can help you out with
Craig
oilpainter
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Posted: Friday, September 07, 2007 - 07:15 AM UTC
Hello Craig,

thanks for coming back on this with more detailed descriptions. You're a very patient guy, indeed. That's a great comfort. I was rather busy this week myself and had no interest in going on the PC in the evenings as well.
I have meanwhile also found your instructions for painting the face of your Tarleton bust (so far I was going by the pictures in your archive and failed miserably in comprehending). The instructions are very detailed indeed and leave no more questions open as to how to paint a figure with oils.
I've bought just some basic W&N artists oil colours (blue, yellow, magenta alone cost me 60 Euros, ~ 80$). Now I HAVE to get a good result!
BTW, I'm doing a 1/6 bust, smaller is too bad for my eyes these days.

I hope the download of the little video worked.

Attilio

PS: Instead of having to build a dry box can't I just stick the figure in the oven at 20°C? That's just luke warm... Alternatively I was thinking of using a blow dryer at some distance. Would either of these be an alternative?
mongo_mel
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Posted: Friday, September 07, 2007 - 10:21 AM UTC
Hi Attilo,
Glad to learn that you found the Tarleton tutorial. I hope it helps you out.
That's a lot of money you spent on those few colors. I'm guessing that the yellow was a Cadmium Yellow. The true Cad. colors are really expensive. The good news is that you'l probably never need to replace it
For drying the oils, I've heard of people using the oven but I wouldn't recomment it. The oil paint might give off something that could be absorbed the next time you use it to cook. Some people pick up a used or a cheap crock pot just for drying paints. As long as it's big enough to fit you figures inside. I'd really avoid using a blow dryer. First, it would take a very long time to have any effect aand would probably burn out quickly. Second, it would tend to blow any dust or lint in the air onto the wet paint where it would stick. Never a good thing
You may have noticed that I mopstly paint busts. My eyes aren't what they used to be either
Best of luck to you. Feel free to drop me a line any time I can help.
Craig
tmas01
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Posted: Wednesday, January 28, 2009 - 12:54 PM UTC
Hi Craig,

thank you so much for taking the time to do that. absolutely fabulous video. I've read a bunch on painting with oils, but it is SO HELPFUL to actually see it.

again, thanks a bunch
demodelbouwer
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Posted: Monday, July 27, 2009 - 08:57 AM UTC
Craig,

Is was nice to see you took the time to make a video about oil painting.
Never the less i think that painting uniforms in the greenish color you use in the Vid is the most easy part.
I've seen many figure models over the last few years and i saw that the pait job done on uniforms in "one tone" color is not so difficult to do.
But most figures "die" when i see the facial parts.
Most of the figures lools like a Disney caracter.
Perhaps it is time to make a vid in how to paint a correct face with the colors used for that.
Only to show that with the use of darker colors on a fresh ground painted face can give a perfect face without turning it into a "Disney puppet"..is not more difficult than the paint job on a uniform in a blue or green "one tone " color.

sincere

Eric
montythefirst
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Posted: Monday, July 27, 2009 - 12:21 PM UTC
a great video really useful, its funny when you think about it if we didn't have the internet how many tips we would all miss out on or would have to accuire from other sources souch as books etc it really has openned up the hobby for me over the past few years and i'm sure for many others , the great thing is that we can all get in touch with like minded people to share our experiences and knowledge i dont about yourselves but im the only person i know personally that makes models so would have no one to discuss all that is miniature with without sites like these.

funny old world it gets smaller and bigger at the same time

anyway enough waffle

great video craig

cheers

Simon
Narn08
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Posted: Thursday, August 06, 2009 - 09:45 PM UTC
Thanks, great video.