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Scratchbuilders!: Aircraft
This is a group for aircraft scratchbuilding questions, topics and projects.
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Adventures in 3-D CAD Parts Design
m_buchler
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Posted: Friday, February 22, 2008 - 05:51 PM UTC
Greetings again.

I thought I'd take a stab at making more resin parts. This time, I'm again venturing into uncharted waters, so to speak, by utilizing a 3-D CAD program to build my pattern masters. The software has a wicked learning curve, with about a million features and functions, so it may not go as quickly as I would like. But with my "total immersion" philosophy, I'm sure I'll get myself into a corner in no time! Here's a shot of an assembly of several individual components:



Can anyone guess what aircraft the parts are for? For an easy answer, I have posted more photos of this project on my website ( http://www.vairhead.net/modelshack ) in case anyone wants to see a little more of the project.

Regards-
Mark

slodder
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Posted: Saturday, February 23, 2008 - 12:22 AM UTC
Well, I think the loop control is from the UK,so I'm going to guess a Spitfire or maybe a Hurricane.

As far as scratching 3D parts you need to check out Printapart.com Very cool creation of parts.



Printapart feature
m_buchler
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Posted: Saturday, February 23, 2008 - 05:59 AM UTC
No, it's not British...

I read an article featuring Printapart in Finescale Modeler several months back, I will be trying them when it's time for output.
slodder
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Posted: Saturday, February 23, 2008 - 07:02 AM UTC
Not British huh..... Ok.... I had even looked through my book 'Cockpit' after I guess and expanded it to a Typhoon.....?
Italian? I'm really curious now
slodder
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Posted: Saturday, February 23, 2008 - 08:28 AM UTC
So, curiousity got me and I went and looked up the answer... Nice!

Great site too.
m_buchler
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Posted: Saturday, February 23, 2008 - 09:02 AM UTC

Quoted Text

So, curiousity got me and I went and looked up the answer... Nice!

Great site too.



Thank you kindly!
AlexanderK
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Posted: Saturday, February 23, 2008 - 01:19 PM UTC
I'm currently taking Cad 3d and solidworksIn school. I have a few hours using the program and yes it can be a little crazy at first. But with a little practice you can get over the learning curve. So how do you plan to take the drawing that you complete and turn them into finished parts?

AlexanderK
m_buchler
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Posted: Saturday, February 23, 2008 - 01:41 PM UTC

Quoted Text

... So how do you plan to take the drawing that you complete and turn them into finished parts?

AlexanderK



I plan on sending the files to printapart.com, apparently they do the stereo lithography printing, then they mail the outputs to you.
AlexanderK
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Posted: Saturday, March 08, 2008 - 07:25 AM UTC

Quoted Text

I plan on sending the files to printapart.com, apparently they do the stereo lithography printing, then they mail the outputs to you.



Let me know the out come of your parts I'm interested in the process. I read an article in Fine scale modeler a while back and happen to show my CAD instructor at the time. He told me.. just so happens that the school was thinking about getting a printer like the one they use but I think the CAD department kinda talked them out of it due to the cost of the printer itself.
too bad

AlexanderK
slodder
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Posted: Saturday, March 08, 2008 - 10:49 AM UTC
I can tell you Printapart is fantastic. I've used them and they are good.

I would read the feature and the tips on how to keep the cost down. If you have a really complex (or large) piece it will cost more. Complex also means more plot points or higher resolution.

The site is cool, it lets you upload files and run them through a pricing model to see how expensive they'll be, then you tweak the drawing and up load then next.

Check it out - I did these in October of 2006
Thier facility is really cool.

Vendor profile

Review
m_buchler
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Posted: Friday, April 04, 2008 - 03:27 PM UTC
Here's a shot of the printed outputs from my 3D/CAD files. They're exact to parts I drew on my computer (flaws included!). As this was my first experience with this sort of parts production, it was difficult to visualize just how fine the small details would be on the final outputs. A few areas, such as the column handgrip, will have to be beefed up, then re-sent to Print-a Part for another output, otherwise, I'd doubt resin would flow into the final mold.



Overall I'm happy, most everything came out as planned. The parts will require a fine sanding before molds are made, since there are fine ridges running through most every part. This is a byproduct of the current technology, apparently.

Once again, these parts are for the Academy/Hobbycraft Polikarpov I-16 (1:48).

(If you should get the dreaded red "X", try hitting the refresh button. There seems to be some intermittent flakiness going on from my web host.)

Neo
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Posted: Saturday, April 05, 2008 - 10:34 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Here's a shot of the printed outputs from my 3D/CAD files. They're exact to parts I drew on my computer (flaws included!). As this was my first experience with this sort of parts production, it was difficult to visualize just how fine the small details would be on the final outputs. A few areas, such as the column handgrip, will have to be beefed up, then re-sent to Print-a Part for another output, otherwise, I'd doubt resin would flow into the final mold.



Overall I'm happy, most everything came out as planned. The parts will require a fine sanding before molds are made, since there are fine ridges running through most every part. This is a byproduct of the current technology, apparently.



Looks very good. What software are you using?

I was thinking of using Print-Part also. Can you give me an approx. idea of about how much the above parts cost (if you don't mind of course).


Thanks
NEO
slodder
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Posted: Saturday, April 05, 2008 - 10:59 AM UTC
Those look really good. I agree, resin couldn't have done some of that detail.

The way the printer works you will get fine horizontal lines all the way up the part. The printer prints layers of 'ink' vertically and it's the striations between layers that create the fine lines. So, it is 'just the way it works' for now anyway.

I think your project is a success.
c_benshoof
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Posted: Saturday, April 05, 2008 - 11:05 AM UTC
I too would like to know what software program you are using, is it hard to learn how to draw to a model scale?
goldenpony
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Posted: Saturday, April 05, 2008 - 03:29 PM UTC
That is a really interesting. We switched to Catia at work and so far I am the go to guy for that.

I am going to get some info about that process and see if maybe we could use soemthing like that to help us out with prototype parts.

Thanks for sharing everyone!

m_buchler
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Posted: Saturday, April 05, 2008 - 08:18 PM UTC

Quoted Text


Looks very good. What software are you using?

I was thinking of using Print-Part also. Can you give me an approx. idea of about how much the above parts cost (if you don't mind of course).


Thanks
NEO



I'm using SolidWorks. The output cost was around $80 for everything.
m_buchler
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Posted: Saturday, April 05, 2008 - 08:25 PM UTC

Quoted Text

.... is it hard to learn how to draw to a model scale?



Hard to learn? This is rather subjective, as everyone has different learning curves. I already have an extensive computer graphics background, but I can truly say that 3D/CAD is a little like learning brain surgery. There's a myriad of tools, and rarely only just one method to building a part. My reference manual is a good 2-1/2" thick. There's still soooo much I need to learn.
slodder
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Posted: Sunday, April 06, 2008 - 12:22 AM UTC
Just a note about the software you use. It doesn't matter which software you use to generate the drawings as long as the software can generate/save as STL file (stereolithography file).
c_benshoof
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Posted: Sunday, April 06, 2008 - 09:29 AM UTC
ok got it....one question i still have about the scale thing is how does printapart know what scale to build the drawing? that is do i have to make sure the drawing on the computer is a certain size, or is there basicaly a button i can click to scale it to what i need? if that makes any sense.....i dont know much about CAD programs that is why i ask because i really what to learn.

thanks
m_buchler
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Posted: Sunday, April 06, 2008 - 09:53 AM UTC

Quoted Text

ok got it....one question i still have about the scale thing is how does printapart know what scale to build the drawing? that is do i have to make sure the drawing on the computer is a certain size, or is there basicaly a button i can click to scale it to what i need? if that makes any sense.....i dont know much about CAD programs that is why i ask because i really what to learn.

thanks



I draw the parts at actual size (1:48 scale, in this case). I notice that SolidWorks allows one to scale up a solid by factors of 1, 2, 3, etc., but I see no option to scale down a solid. But I'm no expert in SolidWorks, mind you.
goldenpony
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Posted: Sunday, April 06, 2008 - 02:09 PM UTC
Your book was only 2 1/2" thick, I have 2 different books. One for making seperate parts, the other for putting them together. Each is well over 3" thick.

m_buchler
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Posted: Sunday, April 06, 2008 - 08:20 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Your book was only 2 1/2" thick, I have 2 different books. One for making seperate parts, the other for putting them together. Each is well over 3" thick.




Sheesh, that's over 6" of reading! I tend to be a pragmatist. I try to take the shortest route possible! Little wonder my progress is slow!

Fpr those of you who are wondering, The "SolidWorks Bible" is a very good reference guide. The "SolidWorks for Dummies" book is not, in fact it's rather lousey.
goldenpony
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Posted: Monday, April 07, 2008 - 06:10 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

Your book was only 2 1/2" thick, I have 2 different books. One for making seperate parts, the other for putting them together. Each is well over 3" thick.




Sheesh, that's over 6" of reading! I tend to be a pragmatist. I try to take the shortest route possible! Little wonder my progress is slow!

Fpr those of you who are wondering, The "SolidWorks Bible" is a very good reference guide. The "SolidWorks for Dummies" book is not, in fact it's rather lousey.



I find most books for dummies to be a waste of $.

We had 7 days of training when we got our system. Then i was cut loose. I would spend some time each day making junk parts and figuring out the commands. Then when I started on actual parts I didn't have much trouble.

Here is an example of parts we make at our place.




c_benshoof
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Posted: Monday, April 07, 2008 - 08:36 AM UTC
OK thanks for the help in this guys.....now to find a good program to use....
m_buchler
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Posted: Friday, May 02, 2008 - 01:07 PM UTC
Here are some photos of the final resin parts:





There are more photos of the final parts posted on my website.