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Bailey Bridge (repost)
matt
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Posted: Friday, April 26, 2002 - 01:00 AM UTC
Any one have info on Bailey bridges?

I have the army's TM

http://www.baileybridge.com was no help (they sent me to the manual)

There's a bridge in Toronto Canada I may have to go visit (if all else fails)

Thanks,

Matt
YodaMan
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Posted: Friday, April 26, 2002 - 01:26 AM UTC
What's a Bailey Bridge?

YodaMan
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matt
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Posted: Friday, April 26, 2002 - 01:32 AM UTC
It's a "erector set" type of bridge developed by the British during WWII.
The US army uses it from WWII through 'Nam I believe it's still in inventory but is bieng replaced by a bridge capable of a larger load (m1a2's)

Matt
m1garand
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Posted: Friday, April 26, 2002 - 01:34 AM UTC


pics here:
http://www.mabey.co.uk/bailey.html

Bailey bridge
n.
A steel bridge designed to be shipped in parts and assembled rapidly.


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[After Sir Donald Bailey (1901-1985), British engineer.]

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bailey bridge

n : a temporary bridge designed for rapid construction [syn: Bailey bridge]
ARENGCA
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Posted: Friday, April 26, 2002 - 10:01 AM UTC

Quoted Text

What's a Bailey Bridge?



Simply put, a Bailey Bridge is a semi-permanent bridge that the Army uses. It is not a combat bridge, although they were emplaced under fire during WWII. They can be assembled with only man power, and can be emplaced with limited bank and approach preparation. It can be placed onto existing abutments and supports, or can be placed on riverbanks with intermediate supports that are part of the system. Bailey's have been used on pontons (proper spelling and pronunciation!), to produce a floating bridge. The Bailey is usually launched from one bank, using it's own weight to cantilever the far end over the gap. (As bridge bays are added on the near side, the bridge is pushed forward on rollers to just before the balance point, and more bays are added. Once the "launching nose" reaches the far side, rollers are placed there, and the final bridge is rolled onto the far bank.)

The basic part of a Bailey is the panel truss. There are other parts, but the strength of the bridge itself is based on the number of panels used per "bay' of bridge (10'). Baileys are provided in "kits" that assemble into a certain length of bridge, and a basic launching set. By adding additional modules, more length or greater strength can be built. Modules for intermediate supports and additional reinforcing are also available.

The strength ("bridge class", the little round yellow numbers on the front of vehicles) of the bridge depends on two things. The first is the length of the longest unsupported span. The second is the way the bridge is constructed. By increasing the number of panel trusses used on each side (either 1, 2, or 3) per 10' of bridge, the strength of the bridge increases. By stacking the trusses into "stories", the strength of the bridge can be increased. Baileys are named based on the construction, from 'Single-single' to 'Triple-triple'. A 'triple-triple' is an impressive structure (requiring a crane to build), and can generally handle any military traffic that might pass.


Quoted Text

The US army uses it from WWII through 'Nam I believe it's still in inventory but is bieng replaced by a bridge capable of a larger load (m1a2's)



There was some discussion of eliminating the Bailey Bridge from the inventory some years ago. As far as I know they were not eliminated, and the bridge is still manufactured for the government. As of two years ago, the Engineer School at Ft. Leonard Wood was still teaching bridge crewmen (including navy and Marines!) to build Baileys. In fact, the Bailey is among the strongest available non-permanent bridges, able to handle very high "bridge classes" when properly built.

Now you know more than you ever thought you would about Bailey Bridges.
Ranger74
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Posted: Monday, April 29, 2002 - 11:16 AM UTC
You might trying watching "A Bridge Too Far". There is a scene where some British engineers are installing a Bailey Bridge. One of the "stars", I believe it was Michael Caine, refers to it as that great British invention, or words to that effect.

Jeff