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Best tool to cut off moulded on fenders
thewrongguy
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Ontario, Canada
Member Since: October 17, 2002
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Posted: Monday, January 20, 2014 - 07:23 AM UTC
Hi.

I'm working on an M-10 Achilles kit and have a set of photo etch front fenders. It's the first kit I've built that I'm not building entirely OOB so there is a bit of a learning curve. I was wondering if someone could suggest a good tool for removing the original moulded on set? Would a dremel cut off wheel or a razor saw work best? Any suggestions?

Thank you for your time and advice.

Jeff
Jessie_C
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Posted: Tuesday, January 21, 2014 - 04:55 AM UTC
Depending on how thick the plastic is, you could try scribing with a pin or sewing needle. Keep going over the line between the fender and the body until you cut through.
SgtRam
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AEROSCALE
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Posted: Tuesday, January 21, 2014 - 05:14 AM UTC
Jeff

As Jessica mentioned, scribing will work, or a razor saw is a good choice. I would tend to stay away from Dremel tool, as the heat from cutting tends to melt the plastic.

Kevin
tankmodeler
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Posted: Saturday, February 01, 2014 - 04:48 PM UTC
A razor saw is definitely the way to go for this and below is the best razor saw I've ever used:

http://umm-usa.com/onlinestore/product_info.php?cPath=21_28&products_id=37

These guys also make a number of reasonably priced tools. Their scriber is great! And the hole punches are reasonably priced and friends say they work well.
retiredyank
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Posted: Sunday, February 02, 2014 - 12:33 AM UTC
Scribing is the way to go. You could also try a jeweler's saw.
tankmodeler
#417
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Posted: Sunday, February 02, 2014 - 04:13 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Scribing is the way to go.


With respect, I think that scribing, for cuts that are in a straight line, at least, is the less effective approach. Scribing has to be carefully guided otherwise the tool tends to wander and scribe places you don't want touched. It's also hard to get a perfectly straight scribed line when snapping off a relatively thick item like an M10 fender. Lastly, scribing tends to raise ridges on the edge of the part that have to be removed resulting in more clean-up afterwards.

A good razor saw, espeically the newer, super thin saws like the UMM one I showed, cut cleanly and, with relatively little effort, in a straight line without having to manipulate a ruler, the model and a scribe at the same time. The new thin saws not only remove very little material, but because you are removing little material the saw forces are much less and the saw cuts faster. The UMM saw has a kerf thickness of only about .010" (.25mm) which means that if you are careful, you can actually remove moulded on detail, clean up the surface and still use the removed part somewhere else!

For cutting a curve, the scribe and snap method is good, but for straight lines or arc segments, the saws beat the scribe every time.

Paul
thewrongguy
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Posted: Tuesday, February 04, 2014 - 05:05 AM UTC
Thanks for the all the suggestions. Had a razorsaw similar to the one suggested in my hand at a hobby shop I visited while i was out of town on work. Of course I didn't get it. Will probably order one as the razorsaw I own looks like it should be in a wild west surgeons bag.

Jeff
retiredyank
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Posted: Tuesday, February 04, 2014 - 05:26 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

Scribing is the way to go.


With respect, I think that scribing, for cuts that are in a straight line, at least, is the less effective approach. Scribing has to be carefully guided otherwise the tool tends to wander and scribe places you don't want touched. It's also hard to get a perfectly straight scribed line when snapping off a relatively thick item like an M10 fender. Lastly, scribing tends to raise ridges on the edge of the part that have to be removed resulting in more clean-up afterwards.

A good razor saw, espeically the newer, super thin saws like the UMM one I showed, cut cleanly and, with relatively little effort, in a straight line without having to manipulate a ruler, the model and a scribe at the same time. The new thin saws not only remove very little material, but because you are removing little material the saw forces are much less and the saw cuts faster. The UMM saw has a kerf thickness of only about .010" (.25mm) which means that if you are careful, you can actually remove moulded on detail, clean up the surface and still use the removed part somewhere else!

For cutting a curve, the scribe and snap method is good, but for straight lines or arc segments, the saws beat the scribe every time.

Paul



You should mask the area parallel to the line you wish to scribe.


MORE IMPORTANTLY, let us know how it turns out.