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Early Aviation
Discuss World War I and the early years of aviation thru 1934.
1/32 Acadamy Sopwith Camel F.1
Birch_Albatross
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Berlin, Germany
Member Since: June 14, 2016
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Posted: Thursday, June 16, 2016 - 10:28 PM UTC
Hello - as I realiseed that I'm unable to deal with the detailling of a 1/48 kit without wrecking in at this time. I went to the best trusted modelshop and bought a more cheaper and bigger kit. the well kown Acadamy Sopwith Camel F.1 scaled in 1/32.

Here the review - I hope to get a better results in kit building by using a larger scaled kit.

Here the box:

Further information will follow a.s.a.p.

Birch_Albatross
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Berlin, Germany
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Posted: Friday, June 17, 2016 - 03:02 AM UTC
...and some hours later I fought with the well known ejector marks and the started with these colours to imitate the wood:



And her the first step of wood 'n' aluminium - the first will undergo further work, the second is ready - as far as I look on it.

The Revell Aluminium was mixed with light grey for the painting of the screws a,d both hatches were based in black on the one side and antrazith on the other side. (Please don't ask me if the portside is painted in black or antrazith!)









Next step will be the obvious imitation of the anualrings.

What do you think?

Do I do it the right way?



Christian
GazzaS
#424
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Queensland, Australia
Member Since: April 23, 2015
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Posted: Friday, June 17, 2016 - 03:21 AM UTC
Christian,
Your wood technique doesn't look too bad. Maybe just a little too much light streaking.

When wood is painted with stain, all of the wood fibers absorb some of the stain, making colors closer to uniform.

To get greater variation in staining, carpenter's use wood with greater color and absorption properties like Cedar, or coveted wood like birdseye maple.

Aviation plywood would be a lower weight wood with no knots and little color variation even before staining.

Best wushes,

Gaz
Birch_Albatross
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Berlin, Germany
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Posted: Friday, June 17, 2016 - 04:04 AM UTC
Here the pictures of the Clerget engine:





The colouring of the controlling gear:



and the copper intake tubes:



Some further impressions of the colouring of the metal on the engine:





The weapon:






THe airpump in detail:




...and the wood grain on a copy of the Camel:

GazzaS
#424
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Queensland, Australia
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Posted: Friday, June 17, 2016 - 04:14 AM UTC
Christian,
Nice pictures. The plywood in the last picture has recently been sanded to remove raised areas. As wood ages and is exposed to the elements, certain areas will expand and others will contract depending on moisture and dryness. That is why you see darker brown areas and other areas that look like more natural aged wood.

Gaz
Birch_Albatross
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Berlin, Germany
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Posted: Friday, June 17, 2016 - 03:19 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Christian,
Your wood technique doesn't look too bad. Maybe just a little too much light streaking.

When wood is painted with stain, all of the wood fibers absorb some of the stain, making colors closer to uniform.

To get greater variation in staining, carpenter's use wood with greater color and absorption properties like Cedar, or coveted wood like birdseye maple.

Aviation plywood would be a lower weight wood with no knots and little color variation even before staining.

Best wushes,

Gaz



a)
Thanks a lot, Gaz, that's very interesting to me. I'm starting to read a lot and do not have your knowledge. I was abel to get a little pile of books abot first worldwar one fighters so a stack of Osprey A vs. B books and everything I could cought within reach about Albatros D.I, D.II and D.III. This in particular due to the fact that I love the wood grain - and now I recognise that I'm better in painting of diffrend shades (or is "tints" the better english word in this conherence???) of aluminium, iron and steel than in my beloved wood grain.



And your posts seem tell to me:
"Go over the bright areas with light ink and make it more unicoloured - but NOT too uniformly dull or overly monotonously boring."


This evening I'll be back from a garden party and try to do my very best.



b)
I've to admit, that the scale fits better to my thick glases in front of my eyes. The kit is quite clumsy - the detailling is a "bit reluctant".

But the best thing is I'm happy to make progress, fleel secure in what I'm building and starting "to getting ground under my feet" as we say here in Germany.

It's fun being here with you and getting such much help - thanks a lot.



Christian
GazzaS
#424
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Posted: Friday, June 17, 2016 - 03:40 PM UTC
Christian,
Always glad to help. I look forward to watching your build.

Gaz
RYSZARD
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Krakow, Poland
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Posted: Friday, June 17, 2016 - 05:01 PM UTC
translate
Congratulates the courage, because the model is rather demanding, a little over it you have to work to get a desirable end result. I know something about it .


http://www.aeroscale.co.uk/modules.php?op=modload&name=SquawkBox&file=index&req=viewtopic&topic_id=226495#1908684
Birch_Albatross
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Posted: Saturday, June 18, 2016 - 01:49 AM UTC

Thanks for the link to the kitbuild - that's very helpfull indeed.

I'm much too "tiered" to do anything rigth tonight to the kit - so I leave her allone.
Birch_Albatross
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Berlin, Germany
Member Since: June 14, 2016
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Posted: Saturday, June 18, 2016 - 09:39 PM UTC

Hello followers!

Here is a saying that not everything that looks well:


http://s1027.photobucket.com/user/GreyOrk/media/Engine1_zpsh6dktpn9.jpg.html?sort=3&o=0



is goodly made:

http://s1027.photobucket.com/user/GreyOrk/media/Engine0_zpsdmxjquyn.jpg.html?sort=3&o=1


Here it is completly right - if you manage to bring one cylinder to fit togeter all the others are mismatched more and more.

I'm frustrated - and will now paint it and hope that under the front cover not too much will be seen.

Christian
JackFlash
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Colorado, United States
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Posted: Sunday, June 19, 2016 - 12:40 AM UTC


1/16 scale.