login   |    register

1700
Four Maru's

  • move
"MSW crew-mate Alec Cap (bigal07) shares a group of four of his IJN Maru's in 1/700 scale, in this "On Display" Feature!"

Making a change from the big gun or submarine, I feel that the Maru can offer the builder something a little different, here are my four, an oiler, seaplane tender and a couple of submarine depot ships.

Hie Maru, Heian, Kimikawa and Toa were a few of many of Japan's civilian passenger and cargo ships requisitioned and converted for use as 'special'...the two submarine depot ships were more of a floating base, providing rest and facilities for submarine crews, and while an oiler was simply that, a ship transport, these performed combative duties almost from the beginning of hostilities.

The kits that I used to build these are as follows: Hie Maru and Heian Maru - Hasegawa
Kimikawa Maru - Skywave/Pitroad
Toa Maru - Fujimi

So if you're looking for a vessel off the beaten path, try a Maru!
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move

About the Author

About Alec Cap (bigal07)
FROM: ENGLAND - EAST ANGLIA, UNITED KINGDOM


Comments

Nice looking work. I take it that one with the aircraft and guns is a AMC, Armed Merchant Cruiser? The thing that always strikes me about Japanese cargo ships is how so many of them would be named like California Maru, Manila Maru, New York Maru, and so on.
FEB 05, 2010 - 06:45 AM
Very nice work Alec.
FEB 05, 2010 - 12:28 PM
Alec, Welcome to the 'softer' side of ship modelling (meaning - there are not too many guns on the Marus!!). Really good looking ships. Any plans for a diorama for any (all) of these? Jim S
FEB 08, 2010 - 11:59 AM
Very nice set, makes for an interesting design study comparing their features, way cool Alec!
FEB 09, 2010 - 02:58 PM
The word "maru" originated in the seventh century and has since come to > serve as a popular name for a host of Japanese vessels. The first ship to > use the suffix is said to have been the 16th century ship called the Nipon > Maru, built by the legendary Toyotomi Hideyoschi. However, despite its > widespread use, the word has never been graced with a definitive Some time ago I built a large naval base for photographing waterline models, while the dockyard would remain the same, the different types of surface craft would come and go, the huge problem was of course space/room which I honestly don't have a great deal of, when I saw Jim Smith's work it reminded me of - certain models cry out for a diorama - again this raises a problem what to do with them. With a multi functional diorama base to work from, I can photograph and store models easily, the 4 Maru's I have so far will all go into a diorama in the near future. We're not the same and obviously everyone has different ideas of what a diorama is, and should look like, my idea is basically a bit of everything, my HMS Echo is as small as I would build a diorama for a perm-base. At the moment I have asked for help with ideas, advise, help you name it in building my next diorama multi base, this time, it will have a maximum of 7 inches wide with a length of 30 inches. Many thanks for the replies.
FEB 11, 2010 - 07:52 AM